ENTERTAINMENT NEWS AND CAREER ADVICE

Archive for February, 2011

MUSIC VIDEOS: SON-RAY’S LONG AWAITED NY ANTHEM VIDEO IS HERE!!!!

Arch 2


Music Videos: DRE Is Killing’em with these videos!!!

Dr Dree


Industry Tips and Advice: 6 Critical Insights Into Music Business Success by Kyle Bylin

This post is by Hypebot intern Hisham Dahud. His Twitter: @HishamDahud.

This past Tuesday, San Francisco State University’s Music and Recording Industry Program held a professional’s panel consisting of prominent Bay Area music industry figures discussing strategies that artists could utilize to garner an audience and eventually sell directly to them. Here are the highlights:

1. On Building a Team…

Damian “Domino” Siguenza of the renowned Hieroglyphics Crew stresses the importance of doing as much as you can on your own before seeking out any external help. “Initially, it might be just your friends and other people who believe in you,” he said. “Get the word out in the most cost effective and creative ways you can. Get as far as you can on your own, and only once you start gaining some momentum should you begin outsourcing.”

Josh Goldstein of Machete Vox Records mentions that in the early stages, you may have a lot less time to put into your music, but all the grunt work is certainly needed. There are plenty of people who may not be as talented as you, but put in several times the amount of work and will be heard while you won’t be.

2. On Remaining Consistent…

J Sider, founder of Root Music points out that Facebook works well because it’s a consistent platform where users share content that shows off their personality. In its prime, MySpace delivered two things perfectly: the music player and the upcoming shows section– both of which were easily located and identified. Now that users are enabled to rearrange content on MySpace, it’s lost fluidity. The lesson is that if you do end up making changes to your website, be very clear as to why, and be sure to listen for feedback.

Mike Stevens of Temple Music Group feels that when it comes to branding strategies, it’s always important to have your target audience in mind. Know exactly whom you’re trying to reach, find who they are through analytical data, and then speak to them directly through email.

3. On Getting Signed to a Label…

Mike Stevens mentions that for those artists looking to be signed to a label, they need to demonstrate that they already understand the fundamentals of direct-to-fan marketing and sales through their own independent business practices. If they don’t do that, the majority of labels will look past them.

4. On Communicating with Fans…

J Sider points out that when an artist is sending out content to their fans on Facebook, the message is not going to reach all those people who “like” them. It will only reach those who are active on their artist’s page or those who are linked to people that are active. He goes on to suggest that when sending out something seeking any form of support from, it’s best to send emails rather than posts.

Tyler Peterson of EventBrite suggests that artists should first identify and label their fans in their perspective tier (i.e. potential, casual, regular, and super fans), and then remember to communicate with each tier differently. Keep each group happy by offering segmented products lines. Don’t push the higher tier products to fans that haven’t invested enough of their time and/or money into your music.

Naomi Weisenburg of BlinkerActive advises to never “cast a wide net” in communicating fans and to make things as personal possible.

5. On Merchandise…

Domino advises artists to protect their brand at all cost. When it comes to merchandise, it should be looked at as fans essentially paying you to promote you. He goes on to suggest stratifying your merchandise line and that it would behoove you to think in terms of profit margins. Smaller [cheaper] items like car fresheners and buttons can be thrown into bundles or they can be sold individually, but they’ll eventually increase your overall returns. As an independent label, Domino’s merchandise provided the bread and butter to fund other facets of his business. This is because merchandise was always consistent. The music acts as a medium in which other things that center around the music itself are monetized.

6. On Maximizing the Live Experience…

Tyler Peterson recommends using high quality videos of past live performances to give people a perspective of what your shows are actually like and to provide that content to your fans. He also mentions that artists can even use EventBrite to have fans RSVP to shows and capture their data for follow up efforts.

SOURCE:

http://www.hypebot.com


Industry Tips and Advice: Music Biz Students – Don’t Let The Sky Fall On You! by Kyle Bylin

Music Biz Students – Don’t Let The Sky Fall On You!

This week, I had the opportunity to guest lecture in a music business class. Before the event, I had no way of knowing whether I’d do terrible or spectacular. I put my notecards together and rehearsed my speech to my wall. Prior to this, I had only spoken at Next Big Nashville, but that was an interview.

Luckily, public speaking doesn’t make me nervous, but that doesn’t mean I’d be any good at it. You can still do horrible at things that don’t put you in a cold sweat and make you shake. Especially the things that you lack experience in, have not taken classes on, and have never done before. Yet standing in front of the stage – looking into a sea of students – I felt right at home. The presentation went fantastic. I nailed my key points and adapted as the discussion evolved.

Speaking turned out to be an absolute blast. The feeling that I may have actually taught these students something is even better. I’ll admit though, that I may have layered on the doomsday talk a bit heavy. It was not my intent to scare them, but I’m left with the impression that no one has tried to scare them before. Sadly, the music industry is not a cute puppy, it’s a pit-bull. And the sooner that you learn that, the better off you are. It’s one thing if you’ve been given the sky is falling talk before and chose to stay in the music industry regardless, because you’re foolish and crazy – like all of us. It’s quite another if no one has given you that talk and you have no idea what you’re getting yourself into. Then, there’s reason to worry.

Positive Delusion

Humans are capable of rationalizing some wild things, but the music industry isn’t one of those things you shouldn’t leave your mind to justify. Trust me, this is a cold shower that no one wants. A positive delusion is what enables us to love people that are flawed; it’s what helps people in the trenches pursue their dreams despite overwhelming odds. However, if you do actually believe that the music industry is a wonderful place where jobs are abundant and a great GPA will get you one, then you’re just delusional. This job market doesn’t work that way.

Never has.

But when you’re 18 or 19, studying the music industry in college, it’s fairly easy to believe that the music industry does work this way. I know I did. Back when I was still in school, I was convinced that I was one internship away from a career. I was convinced that somehow things would magically work out. The good thing though is that I did have teachers that – while they still all bullshitted us to some degree – were willing to tell us that the music industry is an ugly place… with a few special opportunities. Each of us were all still delusional, as we were young and didn’t know any better, but our expectations were somewhat more grounded.

Chicken Little

This is why it’s important to have an equal mix of the “sky is falling” talk vs. “the revolution is now” talk. Make no mistake, the sky has been falling for a couple decades now and everyone has simply gotten used to Chicken Little showing up every few years to tell them that this time, it’s really over. This time the major labels will buckle. Likewise, everyone is used to the fact that pundits will say, each year, that this is the best time to get in the industry and do what you love.

There’s truth to both, but when you’re in school, most of the time, you’re not told this. It’s a dash of black clouds, but don’t worry, by the time you graduate, the storm will be over. And this is where most students get themselves into trouble.

When you’re in school, looking three years into the future, it’s easy to just deal with that when it comes, to not worry, and pretend that everything will go lovely.

Real life, whatever that is, doesn’t work that way. And if you’ve spent thousands of dollars on an education and have grown convinced the industry is a cute puppy only to find out that it’s a pit-bull, prepare to cry. It sucks that no one told you.

This is why I’m all right with the fact that I may have disheartened a few souls in my talk. I warned them. It’s easy to graduate with a degree in the music business and become a victim – no one told you. Blame the school. Blame the teachers.

Whatever.

But if at some point in your academic career someone did gave you the “sky is falling” talk with a little bit of “the revolution is now” mixed in. Years later, when you’re on your second or third internship, eating cup ramen, and getting bashed by your parents for marking such ill-advised career choices, maybe you’ll realize that the person who gave that talk isn’t as stupid as you thought. Why is that?

They were once you.

Victims & Victors

It’s here when a person decides if they’re foolish and crazy, want to become a student of the music industry, and are prepared to intern or die. Winners quit all the time; it’s why most successful people are successful. They stopped doing things. They pushed through a dip and quit the others. Is this your dip? Do you have an evil plan to make it work? This is what separates victims from victors.

Victims either a) blame their schools for not telling them that the music industry is a pit-bull or b) rationalize that the bearer of bad news must be an idiot. Victors, on the other hand, either a) quit the music industry and do something else or b) listen to all of the doomsday talk and decide to pursue a career in the industry anyways. Why? Because chances are, they’re foolish and crazy – just like us.

And just like you.

Don’t let the sky fall on you, the music industry has always had a Chicken Little problem. Every time a new technology comes along, someone screams bloody murder. Someone declares the death of the music industry and everything that’s sacred. Similarly, don’t believe that the revolution is now either. It’s not now, it’s more like ongoing and endless. The first digital decade has ended and the next one will be just as disruptive and uncertain. Take in an equal mix of both views, step back, and breathe for a second. The sky will only fall on you if you let it.

So, don’t let it fall.

Victims are always waiting for the end to come. They pray for chaos. Victors don’t wait for the end to come. They create the chaos. That’s a big difference. The sky will fall when it falls. Don’t wait for chaos. Create the chaos. Stop waiting.

The revolution is now.

SOURCE:

http://www.hypebot.com


SPORTS: D’Alessandro: Deron Williams trade changes profile of Nets GM Billy King By Dave D’Alessandro/Star-Ledger Columnist

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Industry Tips and Advice: All Access Free Webinar ‘Facebook Tools & Tips’ Wednesday, March 2nd — Sign Up Now


Free Facebook Webinar
ALL ACCESS is ready to present “Facebook Tools & Tips” the third in our free digital webinar series for 2011, powered by TRITON DIGITAL, this coming week, on WEDNESDAY (3/2) at 1p (ET), 10a (PT).
NICK GRUDIN, Manager of Strategic Partner Development For Media at FACEBOOK joins TRITON DIGITAL VP/Strategy JIM KERR to discuss how radio can maximize its use of FACEBOOK.
What tools are available? What kinds of things have other media done with FACEBOOK that radio can learn from? What does FACEBOOK have planned for the future? How can you take the robust profile and interactive data from Facebook and apply them to your own audience interactions, from email to couponing? These and other questions will be addressed in this unique webinar, which connects a senior representative of FACEBOOK with the radio industry for the first time.
Got 20 minutes? You’ll learn a lot! It’s free! !

SOURCE:

http://www.allaccess.com


REAL TALK: LET’S CONNECT THE DOTS

For those of you that may not know, I’m currently enrolled into Full Sail University, pursuing my Bachelor of Science degree in Music Business. During the Month of February (2011) I had the privilege of learning about marketing, an integrate and important tool in any business plan, regardless if the product is music in physical or digital form, merchandise, concert events, books or any other product that you may be interested in selling. Marketing is the science of knowing your customer, knowing your product and knowing your company. Once you know these factors it is then important to determine your marketing approach through a series of elements that if not determined correctly can lead to a product falling short of reaching revenue generating expectations.

During my marketing class we explored and examined a self made business, Johnny Cupcakes, which is a great example of marketing at it’s best. Between a great marketing mix (product, price, target market and distribution concentration), John Earle designed and created a dream from some simple philosophies such as creating a brand, personal touch of delivery via relationship building as well as a well thought out niche strategy.

Basic principals of marketing dictate that a well thought out marketing plan consist of a marketing mix. These intricate factors such as the actual product being sold/marketed, the price the product can be sold for that will spark interest in consumers yet generate a margin for revenue/profits, determining the target market such as gender, income levels, regional areas as well as social background is heavily influenced before deciding regional distribution. In a nutshell the marketing mix is the “Who? What? Where? When? and Why?” of marketing.

Watching the interview with the owner of Johnny Cupcakes, John Earle, it is interesting to hear a man that was never formally trained in marketing or even in business, yet to hear him speak of his experiences as a regular person yet the knowledge runs fluid. Some of the points discussed in forming a viable company are having people within your circle you can trust, although he did stress that friends may or may not always be the best source. Another point that stood out was keeping your product unique and sincere, take the time to grow and develop your brand, makes things that you are interested which the consumer will also be interested in because of the personal niches.

VIDEOS: FULL SAIL UNIVERSItY INTERVIEW with John Earle of Johnny Cupcakes
INTERVIEW – John Earle of Johnny Cupcakes 1 of 2

http://media.online.fullsail.edu/2010/06/GS_JohnEarle_JohnnyCupcakes_Part1b3328ed8-661e-4309-b280-d294688d47fe.mov

INTERVIEW – John Earle of Johnny Cupcakes 2 of 2

http://media.online.fullsail.edu/2010/11/GS_JohnEarle_JohnnyCupcakes_Part21c0a1435-dbf8-44a9-a115-776e4c304fbe.mov

Johnny Cupcakes prides itself on making its products unique, providing limited editions, so that each item sold is personal and unique. By creating an “exclusive” feel to his product line (t-shirts, hats, belts and etc.) it ensures that loyal customers keep coming back, never really knowing when an item will no longer be available. Through this strategy not only do you keep your current and loyal customers returning but it also entices new customers and fan base to want to be part of the community.

Another niche I picked up on is the colt like “community” niche Johnny Cupcakes creates through the design of it’s website. The content found on the website combines many elements in one centralized location which makes it easy for any new or soon to be customers of Johnny Cupcakes to locate. On the web page you can find a fun “50’s” style presentation to a modern new age approach to sell t-shirts, through the niche notion of a cupcake, when in reality the product is not even a pastry, yet integrate enough to find a fun approach of selling by stating that brand Johnny Cupcakes is “0 Carbs”, “0 Sugars” and “0 Fat”. The style of the font, the color palette used, the physical layout of the website invites the viewer to explore the many elements provided across the top in the “Blog”, “Shop”, “Story”, “Events”, “Stores” and “Media” tabs.

Johnny Cupcakes blog is creative and great way to bring the loyal fans, customers and new visitors to a community. The blog creates a community where people can get to know the owner of Johnny Cupcakes, John Earle on a personal level. Bringing a personal touch to the marketing plan allows everyday people to appreciate and understand the brand better, which furthers their interest and continuous support of a brand they believe in.

After absorbing so much material in 1 short month (literally – February is the shortest month of the year), it has helped me to determine a few things for myself and the venture my partner and myself have started in Get It Done Entertainment. Long story short, Get It Done Entertainment is an unsigned artist promotion and marketing company geared to have great unsigned music heard around the world. Kind of a big task – yes I know. But the intent is sincere and the ambition is great and the expectation is success.

After careful review, hard studying, a lot of reading material my partner and I decided to make some changes of ourselves. To start this is what the Get It Done Blog used to look like ()

Although the background of the blog has an entertainment theme, after careful review of the font used, the layout of the blog and the selection of colors – it is clear that the blog was lacking, missing an interest appeal. The question then rose “How are we supposed to attract people to our blog?” After careful review, discussing back and forth with my partner we decided that perhaps the hosting site was not the best way for us to deliver what we want our customers, the musicians we’re trying to promote and the fans that want to know about the musicians, to absorb from. We took it back to the drawing board and came up with a more asteticically pleasing site and layout. This is what the new site looks like ():

Some of the improvements allow us to bring a more eye appeal to the viewer and yet provide a glimpse of our personality and draw attention to the mission of the company (well The Melo trade to the Knicks was just another element we provided by opening the blog to everything entertainment and also capitalize on some of the hype).

So you may be asking yourself – “What the hell does Johnny Cupcakes and the Get it Done Blog have to do with one another?” Great question! The correlation is that knowing your customer, knowing your company and knowing your product and how to present it, where to present it and when to present it is important (of course a healthy plug for you guys to come to the new site – GET IT DONE BLOG). Once you figure those things out you can put together a strategic marketing plan that will get you exposure, fans, digital downloads and a much better chance against the super saturated sea of people trying to do exactly what you are trying to do as well.

So go CONNECT THE DOTS and get to know yourself, your customers and most importantly get to know your product.


ARTICLE: Where Is The Music Industry Located? [GPAPHIC] by Kyle Bylin

We’ve all heard Nashville referred to as “Music City” before, but what’s fascinating is how predominantly the industry as a whole is concentrated there.

In an analysis of music industry establishments – including record labels, distributors, recording studios, and music publishers – urban studies theorist Richard Florida reveals that Nashville, the top ranked city, is literally off the chart when compared to LA and NYC. It has over “180 recording studios, 130 music publishers, 100 live music clubs, and 80 record labels.”

The next runner-ups are LA and Montreal, which don’t even come close. Nashville has roughly 3x as many music establishments as LA. Because of this, Florida deems Nashville the “Silicon Valley of the music business.” He also notes that the city has established itself as mecca for genres beyond country music, it now has large concentrations Christian, pop, rock and punk too. Take a look:

The Evolution of Nashville:

“Over the past several decades, Nashville transformed itself from a rather narrow country music outpost in the 1960s and 1970s into a major center for commercial music.

By the mid-2000s, only New York and Los Angeles housed more musicians. Nashville’s rise is even more impressive when you look at its ratio of musicians to total population.

In 1970, Nashville wasn’t even one of the top five regions by this measure. By 2004, it was the national leader, with nearly four times the U.S. average.

Today, it is home to over 180 recording studios, 130 music publishers, 100 live music clubs, and 80 record labels.”

SOURCE:

http://www.hypebot.com/hypebot/2011/02/where-is-the-music-industry-located-gpaphic.html?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzEmail&utm_campaign=0&utm_content=395530


INTERVIEW: Jay-Z and Warren Buffett Forbes Interview

BIG BUSINESS RIGHT HERE! TAKE NOTES!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJs53brFsOo


SPORTS: Carmelo Anthony Headed To The Big Apple!

“The New York Knicks have acquired Carmelo Anthony, sources told ESPN The Magazine’s senior writer Chris Broussard on Monday night.
The swap is a three-way deal including Minnesota, a league source told Broussard. As a part of the deal, Denver will get Wilson Chandler, Raymond Felton, Danilo Gallinari, Timofey Mozgov, the Knicks’ 2014 first-round draft pick, the Warriors’ 2012 second-round pick, the Warriors’ 2013 second-round pick and $3 million in cash while Chauncey Billups, Shelden Williams, Anthony Carter and Renaldo Balkman will head to New York, according to the Denver Post.

Anthony wasn’t at the Nuggets’ practice on Monday night. Instead, the All-Star forward was in Burbank, Calif., taping a segment on “Conan.”
Anthony, who has been the subject of intense speculation as Thursday’s trade deadline approaches, stayed behind in Los Angeles following the NBA All-Star Game while his teammates gathered at the Pepsi Center.

Team spokesman Tim Gelt told The Associated Press that Anthony’s absence was excused. Late Monday afternoon, Anthony tweeted: “Headed to Burbank to film THE CONAN SHOW.”

Anthony has been the subject of trade talks ever since he declined to sign a three-year, $65 million extension with the Nuggets last summer. His biggest pursuers were the Knicks and New Jersey Nets.”

Message courtesy of ESPN:
Information from The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Industry Tips and Advice: ‘Digitally Protecting and Managing Your Copyrights’ with Tim Smith www.mywerx.com

Digitally Protecting and Managing Your Copyrights’ with Tim Smith

When you begin to create, you don’t know which works will commercially develop to the point where a Library of Congress registration is justified. In addition, managing your copyrights, including everything from songs and master recordings to books and paintings, requires a completely separate system. Fortunately, in this digital age, that has now changed. In this presentation, Tim Smith explains the basics of digital copyrights and digital copyright management, and introduces his company, MyWerx.

MyWerx simple copyright management platform provides songwriters with WerxPost, a free database for managing their life’s work, and WerxConnect, a social network that connects Creators and their collaborators to their work. The WerxProof web and iPhone applications deliver the best possible proof that you are the creator of your works. The evidence includes geolocation (where you were when you created it), dates and time stamps, who you created it with, and multiple copies of the work are easily stored and shared as the work develops.

WerxProof provides superior evidence at the moment of creation at a cost everyone can afford so every work benefits. Later, if you choose to file your copyright with the Library of Congress, your WerxProof date of creation evidence is already established, saving you money, time and peace of mind. It’s simple and better business.

Indie Connect Members Receive 600 MB of Free Storage On My Werx!

SOURCE:

http://indieconnectmagazine.com


Industry Tips And Advice: Advice for Students Considering a Career as a Music Attorney – ArtistsHouseMusic

In this clip from www.artistshousemusic.org – Ed Fair, a music attorney specializing in transactions rather than litigation, gives advice to college students who are interested in becoming entertainment attorneys on how to get started in such a career.


ARTICLE: Stephen Hill On the advantages that higher education – ArtistsHouseMusic

In this clip from www.artistshousemusic.org – Stephen Hill, Executive Vice President of Entertainment and Music Programming for BET discusses the advantages that higher education (or an “adult situation at a young age”) confers on a career in the music industry.


Industry Tips and Advice: Music Industry Quick Tips By Heather McDonald, About.com Guide

Looking for some quick music industry tips to give your music career a boost? Browse these quick and easy music business tips to help you get started in the music business, take your career in a new direction, or just get a little inspiration to try something new. Be sure to bookmark this page so you don’t miss any new tips as they are added!

1. 

Despite the hype, some people DO still use MySpace (this site still gets more clicks through from MySpace than any other social networkig site). Of course, your page could make getting results out of MySpace a no-go. Use these tips to give your page a facelift.

Dream of a Career in Music Production & Recording? Free Info!

Get Your Degree in Entertainment Business, Online with Full Sail!

PR Management Software Designed for the PR Professional. See Free Demo!

2. 

Your promo kit – be it  hard copy or digital – is your calling card. How up to date is yours? Take today and make sure it has all of the latest information.

3. 

A press database comes in handy many, many times in the music industry. If you don’t have one – build one. If you already have one – make sure it is up to date. Learn how.

4. 

Want a good show? Pick the right venue. Find out what you need to consider when venue shopping.

5. 

In this digital music environment, your songs MUST be tagged. Learn more.

6. 

College radio can be your best friend as an up and coming musician. Learn more about scoring some spins.

7. 

Want to play beyond your home town? Find out how a gig swap can help you land an instant audience.

8. 

You need more than social networking to keep your fans involved. Find out how a band newsletter can help.

Get the Business Skills You Need to Start a Record Label. Free Info.

Mule My Morning Jacket Franti 40+ bands on 4 stages

9. 

Hiring PR is a big investment. Get the most bang for your buck by helping your PR company help you.

10. 

Learn why you need to be make sure you are looking out at a sea of fresh faces every time you take the stage.

11. 

Professional communication matters in the music industry. Learn more about why you should always put your most professional foot forward in your music industry communications.

Dream of a Career in Music Production & Recording? Free Info!

Get the Business Skills You Need to Start a Record Label. Free Info.

Natl. TV campaign for new artists. Submit your music today.

12. 

When you reach out to someone in the music industry, make sure you know who is on the other end of the phone/email. Find out why it matters.

13. 

“No” is a word that you are going to hear a lot in the music industry – what matters is what you do next.

14. 

Learn why a house concert can be such a great way to win new fans and fill in dates on your touring itinerary.

15. 

Find out the value of cooperation in the music industry.

SOURCE:

http://musicians.about.com/od/musicindustrybasics/tp/musicindustrytips.htm

http://musicians.about.com/od/musicindustrybasics/tp/musicindustrytips.01.htm


Industry Tips and Advice: How To Make A Mixtape, The Ultimate Guide Part 3

Welcome to the third and final part of the ‘How To Make A Mixtape’ series. This series was started because we kept receiving mixtape related questions, from how to make a mixtape, to more complex and specific ones on pricing and releaseing your mixtape. After replying to a few of those questions individually, we decided to create a series of posts where people could get all the answers they need instantly. These posts becase the “How To Make A Mixtape” series, one of which you’re reading now. So far in this series we’ve answered beginner questions like “What is a mixtape”, to more popular questions such as “Can you use other people’s beats on your mixtape” and “How do you make your mixtape stand out from the crowd”. In this final part, we’ll be look at some questions you’ll need to ask yourself when pricing your mixtape, releasing your mixtape, and promoting your mixtape.

While there’s some very useful information in this topic, our previous topics on the subject of how to make a mixtape provide info on the earlier steps on making the ultimate mixtape. So if you haven’t already done so, you may want to check our previous “how to make a mixtape” posts before reading this one:

Other How To Make A Mixtape Parts

  1. , and
  2. .

If you’ve already read those How To Make A Mixtape guides, we can move forward…

Pricing Your Mixtape

When it comes to pricing your mixtape, it’s often good to think about what the purpose of the mixtape is. Do you want to use the mixtape as a way or promoting yourself as much as possible, or are your goals more profit related?

If mass exposure if your main aim, you may want to give out your mixtape for free, or in a no cost exchange (E.G In exchange for an email address, or for a certain amount of promotion to be done by the fan). This type of pricing strategy can help get your music quite widely spread with the right promotion, but also runs the risk of being seen as a lower quality product (As it was free to obtain).

If making profit is your main aim, you will of course want to sell your mixtape. When pricing it you could go one of two routes:

  1. You can price it on par with other mixtapes within the genre. This’ll subconsciously give the impression it’s worthy of buying as it’s similarly priced as all the other CDs. You will of course need to back this up with a good product if you want people to choose your CD over the many others on display however.
  2. You could under cut the market. The aim here is to make it cheaper then the other CDs available, so people with less cash flow that want a CD will be more inclined to buy your CD over others. Once again, you run the risk of being seen as cheap (In a bad way) and therefore not of a good quality, but with the right marketing you can over come this.

A good strategy I’ve found is to do a mixture of both. You can release a short promo CD for free, then release a bigger paid one soon after. The smaller CD will hopefully get your name out there, then if people like what they hear they will go on to buy your full CD.

When it comes to pricing your mixtape, you also have to think about where you’re selling them. Mixtapes often sell at similar prices to albums in high street stores, but a bit cheaper in underground record shops. If you’re selling them on the streets you can expect to sell them for a fraction of the price, sometimes as low as what you’d get from a .

Releasing Your Mixtape

The next thing we’re going to look at is releasing your mixtape. There’s no point learning how to make a mixtape if you don’t ever release it, your mixtape will do no good in your bedroom collecting dust! Firstly let me say there is no one correct way of releasing your mixtape. The strategy of releasing a successful mixtape will vary depending on what you want to achieve for this mixtape and what music genre you make music in. There are some general tip that can be used for any type of mixtape however, so today we will look at those.

The first thing you need to think about is what format you want to release your mixtape in. Are you going to press it up and put it out as a physical product? Or are you going to keep it as a digital download only? Physical products have the benefit of making you look more like a serious musician, and give the chance for people who don’t like buying online a chance to get your product. A digital download however can save you money in the sense you don’t have to pay to press up your music to CD. It’s also cheap and easy to have your digital downloads distributed to big sites worldwide using sites like , so is worth doing even if you do press up a physical copy ( is free to sign up to and will get your music on iTunes, Amazon and other online music stores).

If you’re giving away your mixtape for free I’ll advice you only release a digital download copy. While there may sometimes be reasons to press up copies of a free mixtape (If you want to give some to important industry figures to make a good impression, or you want some freebies for a show etc) you should generally make your fans go to your website and sign up to your mailing list in exchange for any freebies.

So now you know what format you’re going to release your mixtape in, now is the time to get your music to the general public. If you opted to release your mixtape as a physical product, your best bet would be to go through a distribution company. For a cut of the money you make, a distribution company can get your mixtape into shops you wouldn’t otherwise be able to get them into. This includes both physical and online music shops, and good ones can even get your music distributed worldwide. A typical distributor will take at least £ / $1 for each CD they sell for you, and while this many vary, the price is often worth the service they provide. Another benefit of using a distributor is that they can often collect your money from record shops as soon as the record shop have agreed to stock your CD. That means you won’t have to wait till your CDs are sold to customers to be paid.

While not all music distribution companies operate the same, many distributors that deal directly with independent musicians work like this:

  • Once you have your product, you bring a set amount of pressed up CDs to your distributor.
  • You agree a price that you want for each CD.
  • The distributor then shows your music to shops and tries to get them to take them in. If the shop chooses to sell your product, the distributor receives money for the product.
  • The distributor sells to as many shops as they can in a set period of time. Once the time limit is up they pay you for any CDs they sold, and give you back the ones that didn’t sell.
  • If all CDs are sold they may ask you for more copies if there’s demand from the shops.

The other way to get your music into shops is via ‘sale or return’ deals. This is where you give your mixtapes to record shops, they sell however many of your CDs they can in a set period, then pay your for any CDs they sold in that time. Any CDs they didn’t sell they give back to you. Check out our previous topic  for more info on how to get SOR and distributor deals.

How To Promote Your Mixtape

So no you know how to make a mixtape and you’ve got it in shops, there next stage is to promote it. It’s no good having your mixtape in the shops if no one knows it there. Without the knowledge of it’s existence, no one’s going to buy it. It may sound obvious, but I’ve seen too many musicians put months into making a mixtape, get it into shops, cross their fingers and hope it sells. This is not an effective business strategy, and not one I’d recommend to anyone.

There are many ways to promote your mixtape, but often thinking out the box can do wonders your your marketing efforts (We already talked about  in part two of this guide). On top of that you should look into doing all the tried and tested marketing methods:

  • Live or pre recorded TV or radio shows,
  • Performing at live events,
  • Getting your music to radio and venue Djs to play,
  • Video promotion if you have the budget,
  • Magazine adverts,
  • Online promotion (Social media, on your own website, call in favours on other websites etc), and
  • Flyers (These can be handed out at venues or left places for people to pick up) and other paper based promotion.

I’d suggest you pick a few of these to do rather then attempt all of them. Unless you’ve got a big team and / or budget behind you, it’d probably be best to focus on doing a few of these methods very well.

You should focus most of your promotional efforts pre-launch to raise awareness of your product and build up a want for it, as well as when it’s actually released to make people go out and purchase it. This is the period you’ll get most of your sales, so make as big a noise as you can during this time. The more people talking about it before and during its launch, the more sales you will make.

Having said that, promotion for your mixtape should never stop. Even when initial sales slow down you should at least have adverts for your mixtape on your website, and be promoting it on any radio and TV shows you do. Remember, not every one will have caught your initial launch, so giving new fans a chance to discover your mixtape can mean more sales.

How To Make A Mixtape Conclusion

That’s it for our “How To Make a Mixtape” series, you should no longer be wondering how to make a mixtape, but instead be out there making one instead! I hope you’ve found it useful, please leave any comments or feedback below in the comments section. If you’re currently in the process of making a mixtape, please let us know how it’s going. Similarly if you’ve already released a mixtape and have any advice for our readers let us know. Please share this guide with friends, if any of them want to know how to make a mixtape then forward them this link.

If you haven’t read them already, you can catch our previous posts with more tips on how to make a mixtape below:

,

.

I hope we’ve answered all your how to make a mixtape related questions, good luck with making yours.

SOURCE:

http://www.independentmusicadvice.com/2010/07/how-to-make-a-mixtape-the-ultimate-guide-part-3/


Industry Tips and Advice: How To Make A Mixtape, The Ultimate Guide Part 1

Here at Independent Music Advice, we like to listen to what you as the reader wants. We’ve had many people arriving at our site looking for advice on making mixtapes, but not really finding what they were looking for. Having a quick google search myself, I found there are no real resources showing musicians what to think about when making mixtapes. So we decided to write one!

Over the next three posts we will be looking at some of the most searched for mixtape questions we’ve had! If there’s anything else you want to add or ask, please do so in the comments section.

Once you’ve read this, one please also check out:

  • , &
  • for more mixtape tips and advice.

    What Is A Mixtape

    While mixtapes were originally tapes which compiled people’s favourite songs together, the modern meaning is quite different. Mixtapes are now widely used as a tool for promoting a musician prior to a album or single release. They can also be used to raise awareness of a musician, keeping them in the public eye. While mixtapes are mostly popular in the hip hop and grime music scenes, many other music genres make demos that can typically be described as mixtapes.

    To make it clear:

    • A mixtape does not have to be in tape format. It is most popularly presented in CD or digital download format.
    • While they can be, mixtapes don’t have to be ‘mixed’. Many are in fact a group of songs put together with a small gap in-between like a regular album.
    • While you can use original production for your mixtapes, many people choose to use established instrumentals and save the original material for their album and single releases.
    • Mixtapes are generally at least least six tracks long, but some can fill up a whole 80 minute CD.
    • Although often sold, mixtapes are generally used as promotional products. They’re used to raise awareness of a given musician, sometimes before an album launch.
    • Mixtapes aren’t expected to be at the same quality level as albums, so musicians often use them to get material to the public without worrying about using expensive studios and top quality packaging.

    Why Make A Mixtape?

    There are many reasons people would choose to make a mixtape instead of a single or album, but here are the main ones:

    • Collecting Beats Tend To Be Easier.As many people vocal other people’s instrumentals for their mixtapes, finding backing tracks that are suitable to use can be a lot easier. You don’t have to deal with lazy producers that take ages to get anything to you, you can simply find a instrumental you like online and instantly download it. As many musicians listen to other music in their chosen genre, it can be easy to draw up a list of backing tracks you want to use due to the fact you’ve heard and enjoyed them already. This can cut a lot of time of the planning process.
    • People Who Haven’t Heard You Before Are More Likely To Listen.One of the main selling points for making a mixtape is that people will be more likely to give your music a chance. It can take people a few times listening to a new song before it actually registers with them, especially if it’s a musician that’s new to them. If however you’re a musician and you’re vocals are over one of their favourite songs, you’re more or less guaranteed to have their attention immediately! This is not to say they’ll end up liking your vocal (You will of course need to make your version enjoyable), but you should get more people giving you that initial chance.
    • Subject Matters Are Easier.Some people choose to base their version of a song on the original, keeping the same theme and same vocal styles (E.G. The voice or flow of the original vocalist, similar catchy bits, same subject matter as the original etc). This saves time on constantly thinking up new concept ideas, and allows you to save your original ideas for your singles or album.
    • Mixtapes Are Cheaper To Produce.As mixtapes aren’t expected to be of the same quality as albums, you don’t have to put the same amount of time into it as you would producing an album. And if you’ve ever read more then one post at Independent Music Advice, you’ll know that time is money. Many people don’t use adilibs when making their mixtape, this saves on studio time and therefore money. Many musicians also don’t use top end recording studios when making mixtapes, allowing cheaper studio costs but still a good level of production.Another way some musicians save money when putting out mixtapes is the packaging. Some choose to go for slim line CD cases rather then the more expensive jewel CD cases used for albums. This means the CD is still protected against damage, but for a fraction of the cost.One thing I’ll say about making mixtapes on the cheap however is this: Don’t sacrifice the quality so much that your music becomes un-listen-able. Although you should make small cut backs so your album looks and sounds better then your mixtape (This’ll make people want your album even if they already have lots of your mixtape songs), you need to remember the mixtape is what pre sells the album so needs to sound good in its own right. If you make a poor mixtape, chances are people won’t buy your album.

    How To Make Money From Mixtapes

    How do you make money from mixtapes? Well, you make money from mixtapes in the same way you’d make money from a single or album; By selling them. You can get your mixtape in shops worldwide, from the smaller underground record shops, to the major high street music outlets. You should also get your mixtapes on popular websites such as iTunes and Napster. The best way of doing this is via a distribution website called (This website is free to sign up to so I suggest you sign up and have a look around). Some people also choose to sell their mixtapes in person on busy high streets, setting up base near popular shops within their music genre.

    It’s also a good idea to sell your mixtapes at any live shows you do, especially if you’re the headline act. If this is the case, people will be attending the show to see you, and many will want to take home a souvenir of the occasion. And what better to give (Sell) them then your mixtape?

    Depending on the content of your mixtape (And if you use other people’s instrumentals or not) you may be also able to claim royalties from your mixtape plays. If one of the songs from your mixtape gets played on legal radio for example, if the production and vocals are original you can claim royalties for it. If the production is not original and you haven’t got the owner’s permission to use the instrumental however, you won’t be able to claim money from royalties (And they may even be able to approach you and ask you for money).

    Parts two and three of the ultimate mixtape guide are now out, so check them out via the below links for some more great mixtape tips!

  • , &
  • That’s it for part one, in part two (Of three) we’ll be asking if you can use other people’s beats on your mixtape, we’ll be looking at where you can get beats for your mixtapes from, and finally looking at ways to make your mixtape stand out from the crowd.

    SOURCE:
    http://www.independentmusicadvice.com/2010/06/how-to-make-a-mixtape-the-ultimate-guide-part-1/


    Industry Tips and Advice: How To Promote Your Music With Twitter, The Ultimate Guide Part 2

    Welcome to part two of our two part series on how to promote your music with Twitter. If you haven’t already, we recommend you read the first part so you’re all clued up on the early stages of the process (How to set up an attractive Twitter page, how to find and get targeted music fans to follow you, and how to automate your Twitter promotion using ):

    (Opens in a new window)

    In part two we look at the process of unfollowing non responsive people and why this is important, the art of messaging your Twitter followers without having you messages overlooked (Most Twitter messages are spam, don’t make yours appear as the same), and finally we look at a proven strategy to making money from Twitter and your music. So grab a coffee and get ready to learn, as you’re about to discover the secret to dominating Twitter!

    Unfollowing Non Responsive People

    I mentioned briefly in part one of How To Promote Your Music With Twitter that it is a good idea to unfollow some of your subscribers every few days. I didn’t however tell you why this is the case or how to effectively do so, so I’ll go into it now.

    There are a few reasons why you’d want to unfollow some of your Twitter followers, one of those being because you want to appear to be an authority. Think about it, if you go onto someone’s Twitter profile and you see them following 1000 people but only 3 people follow them back, would you dive any deeper or immediately close the window? Most people would close the window and do something else, which means you’ve lost a potential fan. Image counts for a lot in the independent music business, so make sure you portray the right one everywhere you go.

    When you’re starting out with your Twitter account however, it’s not really possible to have more followers then you have people following you. As you build your numbers up however, you can start deleting followers who either aren’t following you back (You should be deleting these people anyway) or aren’t interacting with your account in any way. As you do this your numbers will look more attractive to new people visiting your page.

    This is all about social proof. A person is much more likely to follow you if they see a lot of other people doing the same.

    I’d recommend deleting anyone you follow that’s not following you back within three days. I say three as not everyone gets to go on their Twitter account daily. Three days is enough for people to accept you, and anyone who doesn’t do so in that time is either not going to follow you back or doesn’t come on enough to be a good person to market to.

    A word of warning however, if you repeatedly follow and unfollow the same people, you are likely to get your Twitter account banned. In reality though it is more or less impossible to remember every person you have added then unfollowed, so how are you supposed to know which people to stay away from? Well, the easiest way to do this is by using . Tweet Adder keeps track of all the people you have followed and unfollowed before, and automatically removes them from your list so you won’t accidentally follow them again. This makes your job a lot easier and means you won’t get banned for abusing the Twitter system. We talked about other ways Tweet Adder can  in part 1, so check that out.

    If you haven’t got Tweet Adder however, it is possible to manually unfollow users that don’t follow you. This isn’t recommended as it can take hours as your Twitter profile builds up (That and the fact you can’t keep track of who you’re following / unfollowing unless you manually make a note of them and check it against each person you follow), but in case you’re interested I’ll tell you how to do it.

    Just to note, Twitter makes this process long winded as they don’t want you to unfollow people just because they’re not following you. It’s not going to get you banned doing so, but is just an extra measure put in place to keep the Twitter community social.

    In order to work this out who you’re following that’s not following you, you need to go to your ‘following’ list. You then click on each individual profile and see if there’s an option to message them. If you get this option it means that you’re both following each other. If there’s no option to message them, it means that there’s not following you. This doesn’t take long when you only follow like 20 people, but when you’ve got a lot more it can take a long time. Have more then a couple of hundred people you follow and it’ll take up a good chunk of your day (Hours). Have 1000 followers and you will have given up on Twitter promotion a long time ago.

    As I mentioned in part one, it’s best to automate your Twitter promotion. Doing is manually take up more time then it’s worth, and can’t be done on the mass scale which you need for it to be effective. Unfollowing users is a prime example why using Tweet Adder makes everything a lot easier.

    How To Easily Unfollow Twitter Followers

    automates all of this for you. If you want to unfollow all users that aren’t following you after say three days, you tell it that, come back in three days and click ‘start’. Because it keep track of all the people you follow and when you follow them, it will automatically select the people who need to be unfollowed and unfollow them. When you’re next following people, it will also make sure it doesn’t follow these same people again.

    Messaging Your Twitter Followers With Your Music

    OK, so now your profile’s designed, you have tweets up on your wall and you’ve started adding people who are starting to follow you back. The next stage however is to further build a connection with these people and get them doing what you want (Which will also benefit them of course). You need to think about what the aim is for your Twitter account. Do you want to use it as a way to drive visitors back to your main website? Or do you want to just use it as a communication place for you and your fans? Either way it is important to send messages to people that follow you.

    In all honesty, there is a lot of spam on Twitter these days. Around 99% of all the messages people send are seen as spam, and therefore often ignored. Having said that, if you send a genuine and helpful message then you’ll get people who will take notice. I’ve used Twitter messaging to get a load of people on the  simply by saying that they can download it for free if they want a career boost. And what independent musician wouldn’t want that?

    When you message people on Twitter, it is good to write a couple of messages that can be sent to anyone but also sounds personal. People should be able to retweet these messages if they please (It does happen, provide people with the goods and they will share the news) and also form a conversation about it. Make people feel like you’re reaching them on their wavelength and they will warm to you. And if they warm to you they’re more likely to listen to your music and become a fan.

    You can send out messages to your followers manually, but often it’s hard to remember which people you have already messaged. It is also a very long process if you’ve followers in the hundreds or thousands. Once again I recommend using  to do this automatically. Once you have a message, put it into Tweet Adder and tell it to send messaged to all new subscribers. It will do this and you can work on something else.

    How To Make Money From Twitter

    Twitter of course is a promotional tool. Having said that, you promote your music in order to get more fans and in turn make more money. So where does Twitter fit into all of this?

    Well, Twitter is a great tool to raise awareness of your music. Using  you can quickly get a load of people to see your profile and in turn travel back to your website (If your Twitter profile interested them enough, just don’t forget to leave a link back to your site on your profile). This is a lot more significant then you think. Baring in mind that if people don’t know about you they won’t become a fan and won’t buy your music, don’t you think that getting a lot of people to listen to your music fast is something that you need to make happen if possible?

    The reality is however that using Twitter won’t make you a over night millionaire. In order for your Twitter promotions to be effective, you need to first have something of value to offer people. If you don’t add anything interesting to your profile but add a load of people, how many of those people do you think will then go on to your website and listen to your music? Very few, if any at all. The thing is, if you don’t offer people something of value (Free songs, witty banter, anything that will make them happy) then Twitter won’t help you make more money from your music.

    If you offer something of value however, Twitter can get you a large amount of fans quick! You can then funnel these people back to your website and . As you may know, mailing lists are one of the best ways to make money from your music career as they can keep you in constant contact with your biggest fans. These are the fans that will buy tickets to your shows and even buy your music.

    Some musicians have trouble with getting people on their mailing lists however, and that’s where Twitter can help. I’ve used Twitter to get hundreds of people on the Independent Music Advice mailing list, as well onto mailing lists of my other sites. My mailing list is one of the biggest assets I have, but it would be a lot more empty without the people that have joined it from Twitter.

    You can also try a direct selling approach with Twitter (E.g. Tweeting about ‘buy my new single’) but I’ve found that to be far less effective then the alternative. People don’t generally like to be sold to, so offering people good value rather then selling to them directly will mean that you’ll make more money from your music career.

    I touch further on how to use Twitter to make you money in our book . The idea is to tweet about where people can download your music for free, then instantly follow a load of new target people. When people see your follow, there will be a number of people who check your profile and see your tweet. Some will then follow it back and go on to download your song free of charge. So how do you make money from this I hear you ask? Well, every time someone downloads your song you are paid money. That’s right, the fan gets your music for free but you’re still paid for this. For more information about how this works, .

    How To Promote Your Music With Twitter Conclusion

    Twitter is a great way to promote your music. It can be used to easily get targeted visitors to check out your songs and potentially become a fan, and we all know that the more true fans you have the better your chances of getting free promotion and making money are. Having said that however, doing it all manually can be more time and effort then it is worth. If you’re serious about promoting your music with Twitter, I suggest you use  to get a lot of potential fans without working much at all.

    So now you know How To Promote Your Music With Twitter, good luck at getting it done!

    SOURCE:

    http://www.independentmusicadvice.com/2011/02/how-to-promote-your-music-with-twitter-the-ultimate-guide-part-2/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+IndependentMusicAdvice+%28Independent+Music+Advice%29


    ARTICLE: Concert Tour Itinerary Template By Heather McDonald, About.com Guide

    Whether you have a tour manager or are going it alone, a concert tour itinerary is your life-on-the-road BFF. The tour itinerary should have all of the information you need about your shows, accommodation and more, all in one handy place. Not sure how to put one together? This template will help. But first, a few caveats: you can write your itinerary anyway you see fit – this is simply a guide to the kind of information you should include. Also, the bigger the tour, in terms of budget, length and personnel, the more complex the tour itinerary gets. The example here has most relevance to smaller, indie/DIY tours.

    OK, then. Here is your tour itinerary template:

    • Date and City – At the top of the page, put the date and the city you will be in for that day.
    • Venue Name, Address and Phone Number
    • Promoter/Venue Contact Person – Who is promoting the show? Include name, phone number and email address
    • Contacts for Other Acts – If you can, include contacts for other acts on the bill.
    • Press Obligations – Are you expected for any interviews/radio sessions? Are there any phone interviews planned? Include time, location, and contacts.
    • Show Details - , , doors, stage and finish times. Also include what position you are in on the bill and the name of the other acts.
    • Fee for The Show – What is the agreed fee for the show? Who made the agreement? Is there a contract?
    • Accommodation Info – Where will you be staying? Include name, address, phone number, and reservation number (assuming you’re not couch crashing!). Also include directions from the venue, room rate, number of rooms and/or info on whether the room was provided by the promoter.
    • Additional Info – Here, put any special details specific to this show. Are you sharing a drum kit with the openers? Is the promoter providing a meal? Is there a venue fee for selling merch? How many guest lists spots do you have? Any important people expect to be at the show? Make sure all of these relevant little details go here.
    • What’s Up Next? – Where are you heading tomorrow? How long will it take to get there and what time does everyone need to be in the van? Don’t forget to account for any press obligations you need to roll into town early for.

    It’s a good idea for everyone on the tour to have a copy of the tour itinerary and for there to be a main page that includes cell phones for everyone else on the tour, plus info about any everyone should expect to get. You should also map out the whole tour, with complete driving directions. You can decide if everyone needs a copy of all of the directions or if it is ok for just the drive to have that info, but you should include traveling times on everyone’s itinerary.

    Suggested Reading

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    Suggested Reading

    Related Articles

    SOURCE:

    http://musicians.about.com/od/gigsandtouring/a/touritinerarytemplate.htm


    ARTICLE: ‘Digitally Protecting and Managing Your Copyrights’ with Tim Smith

    Digitally Protecting and Managing Your Copyrights’ with Tim Smith

    When you begin to create, you don’t know which works will commercially develop to the point where a Library of Congress registration is justified. In addition, managing your copyrights, including everything from songs and master recordings to books and paintings, requires a completely separate system. Fortunately, in this digital age, that has now changed. In this presentation, Tim Smith explains the basics of digital copyrights and digital copyright management, and introduces his company, MyWerx.

    MyWerx simple copyright management platform provides songwriters with WerxPost, a free database for managing their life’s work, and WerxConnect, a social network that connects Creators and their collaborators to their work. The WerxProof web and iPhone applications deliver the best possible proof that you are the creator of your works. The evidence includes geolocation (where you were when you created it), dates and time stamps, who you created it with, and multiple copies of the work are easily stored and shared as the work develops.

    WerxProof provides superior evidence at the moment of creation at a cost everyone can afford so every work benefits. Later, if you choose to file your copyright with the Library of Congress, your WerxProof date of creation evidence is already established, saving you money, time and peace of mind. It’s simple and better business.

    http://indieconnectmagazine.com/protection-management-copyrights-mywerx/

    http://indieconnectmagazine.com/protection-management-copyrights-mywerx/


    ARTICLE: Songwriter Resources © 2010 Vinny Ribas

    Songwriter Resources

    © 2010 Vinny Ribas

    Note: The following resources are not rated in any way. The order of listing is completely random.

    Valuable Websites

    • – Connect with other writers
    • – Connect with other writers
    • – Find collaborators
    • – Everything songwriting
    • – Protect your work from the moment of creation or inspiration
    • – Matches songwriters with song seekers
    • ,  and  – Performing Rights Organizations
    • – Industry-only social network
    • and  – Videos, articles and more on songwriting, licensing and publishing
    • – Songwriting courses
    • – Everything songwriting

    Books

    • ‘The Absolute Essentials of Songwriting Success’ by Rand Bishop
    • ‘The Songwriter’s Coloring Book’ by Bill Pere
    • ‘6 Steps to Songwriting Success’ by Jason Blume
    • Jason’s Blume’s series, also available on CD  – ‘Writing Hit Melodies’, ‘Writing Hit Lyrics’ and ‘Taking Care of Business’
    • ‘Successful Lyric Writing’ by Sheila Davis
    • ‘Makin’ Stuff Up’ by Rand Bishop
    • ‘The Craft and Business Of Songwriting’ by John Braheny
    • ‘The Songwriter’s Marketplace’
    • by Cliff Goldmacher – free e-book
    • ‘1000 Songwriting Ideas’ by Lisa Aschmann

    Tools

    • – songwriting software with multiple tools
    • – Free digital recording software
    • – get your lyrics reviewed
    • – Online rhyming dictionary
    • ‘The New Comprehensive American Rhyming Dictionary’ – rhymes words and phrases
    • – Create rhythm tracks without playing an instrument

    Blogs

    • – Gary Evans

    Competitions

    • Songwriting Contest

    Organizations

    • Search online for local and regional songwriting organizations

    Conferences/Workshops

    Magazines

    Please use the comment box to add to this list so we can create a comprehensive directory of songwriting resources.

    SOURCE:

    http://indieconnectmagazine.com/songwriter-resources/


    ARTICLE: The 6 Stages of An Artist’s Career © 2011 Vinny Ribas

    The 6 Stages of An Artist’s Career

    © 2011 Vinny Ribas

    An artist who has ‘made it’ has most likely reach several major landing points in his or her career. This happens in many different areas of the artist’s career, such as the gigs they played, the recordings they released and the fan base they’ve amassed. After all, success is a process.

    Here are the major steps that an artist takes during their career gigs. Find where your career sits right now on this list. It is important that you know this so that you can: a) know what the next step should be in your rise to the top; b) you don’t try to jump to higher steps before you are ready, and; c) you can gauge how far you are from where you want to be.

    Introduction Mode

    • You’re a brand new act, one that has made a change or one that is going into a new geographic market.
    • You are taking every gig you can just to tighten the act and get exposure.
    • You are frustrated because you’re anxious to get some traction.
    • Gigs are scarce.
    • You fight every day to prove yourself.
    • You are aware that you need to outshine the competition.
    • You can’t command anywhere close to top dollar.
    • The band might be wondering if it’s worth the struggle.

    Exploration Mode

    • You are searching to find your niche, and it’s becoming clearer.
    • You are getting a regular stream of fans signing up for your mailing list at gigs.
    • You are playing multiple kinds of venues and have started to identify the exact places and audiences that you fit best in.
    • Seeing where you fit into budgets, playing with your asking price and wondering what people would really pay you.
    • You are trying new things on stage to up your performance level.
    • You are seriously tightening the act.
    • Little by little you are discovering what your real selling points are.
    • You’re gaining ground on the competition.
    • You’ve released your first CD and you’re selling it at gigs.

    Maintenance Mode

    • You know your audience and have found your niche of venues.
    • You’ve honed your act to please your fans and have a loyal fan following.
    • You keep going back to the same gigs or same kinds of venues.
    • You might have a house gig.
    • Your income stays roughly the same or increases very slowly.
    • You are in your comfort zone.
    • You might settle in to this mode for weeks, months, years or decades.
    • You now have steady income.
    • You are the competition the others are trying to buck.
    • Your mailing list is still growing steadily.
    • You’ve released your second CD.
    • You are getting some Internet and maybe even local airplay.

    Breakaway Mode

    • You are starting to be in high demand.
    • You can now pick and choose when and where you want to play.
    • You’re getting calls from venues in other cities, regions or even other states.
    • You’re playing to many new audiences and in different venues.
    • Name your price rather than being dictated a price.
    • You are getting airplay, on some terrestrial radio and on popular Internet stations.
    • You have an above average income, but your expenses are also higher.
    • You have a business team, such as a booking agent and manager.
    • You feel like your career is moving ahead.
    • You’ve broken away from the local competition.
    • Your 3rd CD has been widely acclaimed.

    Made It Mode

    • You are where you always wanted to be in your career.
    • You have an excess of income above expenses.
    • You have widespread notoriety.
    • You are playing the biggest and best venues.
    • You are on par with the artists you admire.
    • You may reach icon status.
    • You’re at the top of the industry.
    • Your CDs are selling well internationally.

    Post Stardom Mode

    • Your light isn’t shining as brightly.
    • You’re tired.
    • You’re not as in demand as you once were, or you’re not in demand at all.
    • There is a new generation that you are trying to appeal to.
    • There is a new generation that has never heard of you.
    • The industry is looking for ‘younger artists’.
    • You still have a following, but many of your fans have moved on to newer acts.
    • You won’t fill the bigger stadiums any more.
    • You’re playing larger clubs.
    • You consider retiring from music, or actually do.

    Obviously many artists take different paths. Some never quite get to where they want to be. Others rocket to the top right out of the gate. Some catch a lucky break that enables them to skip a few steps along the way. But if you’re not one of the exceptions to the rule, you should be able to match your career to these milestones.

    SOURCE:

    http://indieconnectmagazine.com/stages-artists-career/


    GET IT DONE INTERVIEW: ROBYN SPREE


    You can find ROBYN SPREE on the  mix-tape.

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    WHO IS ROBYN SPREE AND WHAT ARE YOU ABOUT?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    I AM AN UP AND COMING FEMALE HIP HOP MC/ARTIST. I WRITE ALL MY OWN SONGS/HOOKS, AND THIS IS WHAT I LOVE TO DO.

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    HOW DID YOU START YOUR ARTISTIC / MUSICAL CAREER?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    I STARTED WRITING POETRY AT 8, AND BY 15 STARTED RECORDING IN STUDIOS. I  LATER MET DANTE ROSS AND TRU-LIFE, WHO I SIGNED TO AND HAD A DEAL WITH @ELECTRA. ATLANTIC TOOK OVER, I GOT DROPPED, AND BEEN ON MY GRIND SINCE (LONG STORY SHORT)

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    DESCRIBE YOUR MUSIC – WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU MAKE AND WHO IS YOUR TARGET MARKET?

    ROBYN SPREE
    MY MUSIC CAN APPEAL TO A WIDE VARIETY OF PEOPLE. I’M CONTROVERSIAL BECAUSE I SAY WHAT PEOPLE ARE SCARED TO SAY THEMSELVES, I HAVE SONGS THAT EMPOWER WOMEN, I TALK ABOUT WHAT I BEEN THROUGH IN LIFE, AND I SPIT HARDER THAN A LOT OF MALES. I APPEAL TO PEOPLE WHO LOVE HIP HOP.

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    WHAT ARE SOME CHALLENGES YOU FACE AS AN ARTIST?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    I AM A WHITE  FEMALE TRYING TO MAKE IT IN A MALE INDUSTRY

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    HAVE YOU OVER COME THESE CHALLENGES? OR WHAT GAME PLAN DO YOU HAVE TO OVER COME THESE OBSTACLES?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    ONCE YOU HEAR ME SPIT, THE BARRIERS BREAK. MY GAME PLAN IS GIVE THIS MY ALL, 100%

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE CURRENT STATE OF HIP-HOP AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    I THINK EVERYBODY THINKS THEY CAN RAP NOWADAYS, BUT NOT EVERYBODY IS AN ARTIST. PEOPLE ARE RAPPING FOR THE MONEY- NOT FOR THE LOVE OF WHAT THEY DO, AND IT SHOWS IN THE MUSIC.

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT ARTISTS TODAY CAN DO TO MAKE THE MUSIC INDUSTRY BETTER?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    MAKE REAL MUSIC (MUSIC PEOPLE CAN RELATE TO) OR GET THE F#@*  OUT THE INDUSTRY. DON’T LOOK TO MAKE THAT ONE OR TWO HOT SINGLES IN THE ALBUMS YOU MAKE…LOOK TO MAKE EVERY SONG ON YA ALBUM A HOT SONG. CLASSIC

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    WHAT ARTISTS ARE YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCES?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    OF COURSE THE LATE AND GREAT RAPPERS LIKE B.I.G.,PAC, AND PUN WERE DEFINATLY A BIG INFLUENCE TO ME..THEY WERE CLASSIC ALBUM MAKERS. JAY-Z, FIFTY CENT,EMINEM, AND IF I HAD TO SAY A FEMALE IM GOING WITH REMY. THERE IS A LIST OF ARTISTS WHO INSPIRED ME TO GO HARD.

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON?

    ROBYN SPREE:
    I’M DOING SHOWS, FEATURES, AND PUTTING TOGETHER SONGS FOR A MIXTAPE, AND REALLY TRYING TO GET MY NAME OUT EVERYONES MOUTH RIGHT NOW

    GET IT DONE BLOG:
    WHERE CAN YOUR CURRENT AND FUTURE FANS FIND YOU AND YOUR MUSIC? (WEBSITES)

    ROBYN SPREE:
    @FACEBOOK, @REVERBNATION,@TWITTER,OR GOOGLE ME B@#!*

    DISCLAIMER
    The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of Get It Done Entertainment, Get It Done Blog or any other subsidiaries of Get It Done Entertainment or of any members of Get It Done Entertainment.  All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only.  Get It Done Entertainment makes no representations as to accuracy,completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.


    GET IT DONE INTERVIEW: ZEPS

     

    You can find ZEPS on the  mix-tape.

     

     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:  WHO IS ZEPS AND WHAT ARE YOU ABOUT?
    ZEPS:  Making good music and having a fun time while doing it
     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    HOW DID YOU START YOUR ARTISTIC / MUSICAL CAREER?

    ZEPS:  Free styling and making funny songs in high school, then it got serious and I got good at it
     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:  

    DESCRIBE YOUR MUSIC – WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU MAKE AND WHO IS YOUR TARGET MARKET?

    ZEPS:  Versatile. I can rap on any style, tempo, genre it doesn’t matter.    

    My target market is 65-year-old Polish women

     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    WHAT ARE SOME CHALLENGES YOU FACE AS AN ARTIST?

    ZEPS:  Whack beats, shitty sound systems and those awful showcases that you have to sell $20 tickets   

    to your friends so you can perform for 5 minutes.  Hahahaaaa

     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    HAVE YOU OVER COME THESE CHALLENGES? OR WHAT GAME PLAN DO YOU HAVE TO OVER COME THESE OBSTACLES?

    ZEPS:  Stay sharp, always have fun, stay humble and hungry no matter what
     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE CURRENT STATE OF HIP-HOP AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE?

    ZEPS:  Horseshit… a steaming pile of stinking horseshoe.    

    But there are people that still make good shit so I’m not worried

     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT ARTISTS TODAY CAN DO TO MAKE THE MUSIC INDUSTRY BETTER?

    ZEPS:  Stop sucking. If it’s been 5 years and you still suck please quit.    

    But there are real lyricists out there so there’s hope

     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    WHAT ARTISTS ARE YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCES?

    ZEPS:  Dope beats
     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON?
     

    ZEPS:  A lot of European electro/techno/dubstep weird shit.    

    And to balance that out I’m releasing an album of 90s style

     

    boombap tracks exclusively on Spotify & cassette tape with my homie Agonist in Norway

     

    GET IT DONE BLOG:    

    WHERE CAN YOUR CURRENT AND FUTURE FANS FIND YOU AND YOUR MUSIC? (WEBSITES)

    ZEPS:  


    DISCLAIMER
    The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of Get It Done Entertainment, Get It Done Blog or any other subsidiaries of Get It Done Entertainment or of any members of Get It Done Entertainment.  All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only.  Get It Done Entertainment makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.


    FUN ARTICLES: Duct Tape – Proof Music Can Be Made With Anything – from hypebot.com

    Duct Tape – Proof Music Can Be Made With Anything

    Real men (and women) don’t need instruments to make music.

    Below is a fantastic and well-produced gizmo-jam session. Everything makes noise. Done right, it can sound beautiful.

    Next time you’re getting tired of looking at the guitar in the corner, maybe you should raid for kitchen for instruments.

    You’d be surprised how it will sound when it all comes together.  Take a look:

    This is an example, how to use the basic stuff in your room in such creative and musician way. Just take some noisy and voiced objects and record them with any sampler. At the end use all this stuff to create any music u desire. Or… You even don’t need any sampler. Just use your friends, give them gadgets and transform your party into gizmo-jam-session. I can guarantee much fun. Enjoy!

    Tools:

    Canon EOS 5D mkII
    DitoGear™ CrankSlider
    Microphone Shure SM 48

    2 Wine Glases
    Panties
    Bottle Opener
    Drier
    Tape
    Tube Pack From Whiskey
    Spring
    Old Russian Camera
    Spanner
    Water

    Shots, Edit & Music – Mateusz Zdziebko

    vimeo http://vimeo.com/18929809
    SOURCE:

    id=”entry-6a00d83451b36c69e20147e223c9c2970b”>


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