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Archive for October 20, 2011

Sports: N.B.A. Talks Break Off, Threatening November Games By HOWARD BECK

Negotiations to end the N.B.A. lockout collapsed again Thursday night, in spectacular fashion, with more acrimony, mistrust and fiery rhetoric, and despite the involvement of a federal mediator.

The talks ended around 7 p.m., after nearly 30 hours spent over three days at a Manhattan hotel. It is the third time this month that the owners and the players have walked away from each other with a feeling that they could not move any further.

The last breakdown led to the cancellation of the first two weeks of the season. This one guarantees that another two weeks — the balance of the November schedule — will be wiped out soon.

“We were unable to bridge the gap,” Adam Silver, the N.B.A. deputy commissioner, said about 30 minutes after the parties separated. He added, “We’re saddened on behalf of the game.”

No additional meetings are scheduled, and the federal mediator, George Cohen, has effectively withdrawn from the process.

Although Cohen said he would be available if talks were to resume, he issued a bleak assessment, saying in a statement, “No useful purpose would be served by requesting the parties to continue the mediation process at this time.”

The finality was somewhat surprising, given the modest progress that league officials and the players union had made this week, with Cohen’s assistance.

The sides narrowed the gap on a proposed split of revenue, with the N.B.A. offering a 50-50 split, and the players reducing their request to 52.5 percent. But that gap represents about $100 million in today’s terms, and $1 billion over the life of a 10-year deal, which the owners are seeking.

“The players were not prepared to make the move we thought was necessary,” said Silver, who was leading the N.B.A. contingent in place of Commissioner David Stern, who was ill.

Silver’s implication set off union leaders, who said it was the owners who essentially issued an ultimatum — 50-50 or nothing — and called off the talks.

“I want to make it clear that you guys were lied to earlier,” said Derek Fisher, the president of the players union, adding, “They’re interested in telling you one-sided stories that are not true.”

Fisher said that the players “continued to express our willingness to negotiate,” but that the owners refused to budge — or to discuss other issues — without the union’s acceding to the 50-50 split.

The parties had made some progress on a number of smaller items, like the midlevel exception, adjustments to the rookie-scale system and a so-called amnesty provision that would allow teams to waive players to clear salary-cap room.

They spent about 24 hours in a 32-hour span between Tuesday and Wednesday, including a 16-hour session.

Silver said he began the day feeling optimistic. Officials from the players’ side also felt that progress was possible when the talks reconvened early Thursday afternoon, after the N.B.A.’s board of governors meeting.

Union officials suggested that something changed during that owners’ meeting. According to the union, Paul Allen, the Portland Trail Blazers’ owner, was a surprise participants at the labor talks, and had been sent to deliver the owners’ message — that they would move no further.

“This meeting was hijacked,” said Jeffrey Kessler, the union’s outside counsel and their lead negotiator. “Something happened in that board of governors meeting. We were making progress.”

Allen was sent, Kessler said, to deliver a message from the board of governors — “And that view was, ‘Our way or the highway.’ That’s what we were told. We were shocked. We went in there trying to negotiate, and they came in and they said, ‘You either accept 50-50 or we’re done, and we won’t discuss anything else.’ Something happened in that board of governors meeting.”

Kessler spoke long after league officials had departed. The N.B.A. did not immediately respond to his remarks.

The talks took place without Stern, who was ill with flulike symptoms. He communicated with Silver and Peter Holt, the chairman of the N.B.A.’s labor committee, by phone throughout the day.

Stern’s absence was noteworthy but not a major setback; Silver has been the N.B.A.’s point person in negotiations all along.

The board of governors meeting was mostly spent discussing a new revenue-sharing plan, which has been developed on a separate but parallel track from the collective bargaining agreement.

The plan is somewhat dependent on the new labor deal, but Silver reiterated that the revenue-sharing pool would be tripled, to at least $150 million per year, and quadrupled in later seasons.

Although the details remained confidential, the league’s poorest franchises could receive up to $15 million a year under the new revenue-sharing formula, according to a person who has seen the plan. The two biggest payers would be the Los Angeles Lakers, who are expected to contribute $50 million a year, and the Knicks, who are expected to contribute $30 million a year.

The owners’ revenue-sharing plan will not be completed, Silver said, until they know what the new revenue split with the players will be.

“One is dependent on the other,” Silver said, because the collective bargaining agreement sets out how much each team will spend on player salaries. Silver added, “We need to know how much we’re going to need to supplement a large number of our teams to bring them to break even or profitability.”

SOURCE:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/21/sports/basketball/nba-talks-proceed-in-commissioner-david-stern-absence.html


ON DECK hosted by DJ SUSS ONE “Winners Theme” by SON-RAY

"ON DECK" hosted by DJ SUSS ONE

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Mannie Fresh Sits Down With HipHopDX In a Recent Interview. Talks Cash Money, LiL Wayne, Working With Young Jeezy and More.

HipHopDX: I just wanna start off by noting that 10 years later the track for “Still Fly” still amazes me – that breakdown towards the end when you flip the Schoolly D, “Lookin’ at my Gucci,” line still sends shivers down my spine. [Laughs]

Mannie Fresh: Fa Sho. [Laughs] Thank you, dude. That’s alright. Shit, I’m glad it got that effect 10 years later.

DX: So is that the one, is “Still Fly” #1 in the Mannie Fresh production discography?

Mannie Fresh: Nah, man! I haven’t done #1 yet, believe it or not. I’m waiting for Hip Hop to come back. It’s in a crazy state right now. So, to me, I haven’t done #1 yet.

Mannie Fresh Updates On Mystikal’s Comeback Album

DX: You didn’t ?

Mannie Fresh: I mean, when it’s something I feel like is equivalent to like an orgasm or some shit then I’ma know it’s #1. [Laughs]

DX: [Laughs] Well, it may not have been an orgasm, but please tell me Mystikal recorded to that one organ-driven track you played for him in your car – that one with the Al Green vocal sample on it.

Mannie Fresh: Truthfully, bruh, this is it. Like, to record with [Mystikal] is like pulling teeth. He’s a super talented dude, but you can’t get him to stand still for nothing. So it’s kind of been a hard process with me and Mystikal. But I know it’s gonna happen. And I know he gotta feed his family so he kind of all over the place doing shows. But, you know … it’s gonna happen, that’s all I can tell you.

DX: Can you tell me if y’all actually finished any songs?

Mannie Fresh: Yeah, we got some songs that’s finished. We got like a couple of songs that’s finished. But, to me, they not single-driven songs, they just good songs. I’m looking for that excellent song where I’m like, “I know that’s the one.”

DX: So can you let the HipHopDX readers know if you think you guys are gonna get it in again or if it’s sort of on – ?

Mannie Fresh: Oh yeah, we get it in. When time permits, whenever we in the same place, we definitely get it in. Like the thing that just happened, the little cipher with all of us together [that was videotaped]. So, we get it in, it’s more of … I’m a studio dude. I stay there 24 hours a day. But, it’s kind of like when you got somebody who like, “I got three hours,” and I’m like, “Dude, we actually need to build this song.” And the thing of it is, by Mystikal coming home [after being incarcerated since 2003], he kind of got on to the new age of how records are made. And I’m like, “I don’t work like that. I’m really not nobody who gonna send you a beat. I want my beat to complement what you saying.”

DX: Damn, this is just a little disappointing to hear ‘cause I thought like it’s about to be a Mannie Fresh-produced Mystikal album ….

Mannie Fresh: Well, like I’m saying, we have a gang of songs … but we need to sit down and stop [wasting time]. It’s one of them things where [we’re] gonna have to say like, “Hey dude, I’ma take off two weeks, you gonna take off two weeks, and let’s grind it out.”

And the only reason why I’m saying this to you is because I really want him to hear it [from the fans], where it’s like, okay, now you got me on your back and you got the fans on your back.

DX: Yeah, it’s already been too long, you can’t wait any longer.

Mannie Fresh: That’s exactly what I mean.

Mannie Fresh Reveals The History Between Cash Money And No Limit 

DX: Let’s take it back a bit real quick. Break down for the HipHopDX readers your history with Mystikal. ‘Cause a lot of folks mistakenly think because he ended up on No Limit [Records] and you was on Cash Money [Records] that meant y’all didn’t mess with each other.

Mannie Fresh: Nah! The crazy thing is everybody that was artists from Cash Money [Records] to No Limit [Records] knew each other. We grew up in the same circle of doing music. … The two heads of those labels was the people that was beefin’. The artists were never beefin’. But it was just that ‘cause that was your side you had to go with your side. Shit, I been knowing Mystikal before he even made his first record.

DX: Yeah, I didn’t know  that he’s the one who actually took Mystikal to Precise, who signed him to Big Boy [Records].

Mannie Fresh: Yeah. But he had a deal before that – Well, he ain’t have a deal, he had a local record out before that with the dude [KLC]. And KL seen it. Me and KL deejayed in the same club when we was young. And, Mystikal used to hang around the spot. And he just had this style – what he’s doing now – that was like, “Wow. Damn, that’s it! That’s something nobody never heard of.” So the first song that he got put on, it was more of KL hooked him up. Because, KL was the dude who was like, “Man, y’all listen to this dude, pay attention to him.”

DX: I didn’t know you and KL was in a – like, you deejayed together, that’s crazy.

Mannie Fresh: Yeah, we deejayed before either of us was making records. We was deejaying in the same club.

DX: N.O. Hip Hop was crazy interconnected originally. A lot of people don’t know you started your career with another No Limit soldier, Mia X, in a crew called New York Incorporated.

Mannie Fresh: Yeah! Dude, Mac, that was on No Limit, I pretty much raised Mac. He’s in jail right now, but Mac was signed to No Limit. But if you go back and you watch … a video called “I Need Wheels.” Mac was probably nine, 10-years-old in that video, on his first record.

DX: So you produced on his first album, you was down with Mia, so just out of curiosity, how come you didn’t end up on No Limit yourself?

Mannie Fresh: Well, Cash Money was formed before No Limit. No Limit was kinda like … This is the real story of it. [Master] P was out in California. His company was not even started in New Orleans. It was started in [Richmond], California. And, it was one of them [situations where] he came down to visit [New Orleans in 1995] and Cash Money had this song called “[Nigga I’m] Bout It” out. And “Bout It” was like the hottest song on the streets. So basically he took – this is where all the beef started at – he took the slogan, “Bout it,” and ran with it. It was already a local song that Cash Money had out from a group, U.N.L.V. And it was like the hottest song out at the time. So, he was on some ol’ like, “I’m just visiting from California,” [but then] ran with the idea and didn’t say thank you or nothing. And the whole “Bout It Bout It” [by ] thing started his whole legacy. So that was the beef, because everybody was like, “Well damn dude, that wasn’t yours to take. That belonged to Cash Money.”

DX: Wow, I didn’t know that. You produced “Bout It” [for U.N.L.V.]?

Mannie Fresh: Yeah.

DX: Was it similar to the same track [as TRU’s KLC-produced song]? I haven’t heard the original.

Mannie Fresh: No, it wasn’t similar to the same track, but it was just that that slogan was such – it was like “whoadie” at the time. It was like when we started saying whoadie, the world started saying whoadie. And you know when you got something. They knew they had something [with saying] “bout it.” And everybody was like, “Damn, that’s the slogan.” Like, all throughout Louisiana. And all of a sudden, now you got somebody who just [like], “Oh, shit. I can take this and run with it and make it worldwide. And I ain’t even gonna tell y’all, ‘Thank you.’”

DX: Wow, wow, you droppin’ some history here. So you know this is the part of the interview where we segue into the Cash Money stuff. I don’t wanna make you rehash like 15 years of history, but I do wanna kinda get some final clarification on just what really happened with the Big Tymers, if y’all fell out really over royalties or there was more to it?

Mannie Fresh: Yeah, all of that: royalties, loyalties, all of that. That could go on for forever [breaking that down]. But it’s the same situation that you hear [about business relationships ending] everyday: over money, over what’s right morally and all of that.

DX: I mean, maybe it’s not my business, maybe it’s nobody’s business, but did you ever just go to him like, “Why?” “Why the fuck are you messing this up?” Like, “Why?”

Mannie Fresh: Yeah. I’ve had that situation even recently like, “Dude, was that all really worth that?” And on top of that, if you had an opportunity to fix it, why won’t you fix it? Like, is it that crucial? I would say this, if I did do something dude, and I’m a human being, even if it took me five years I owe you an apology. And it was never an apology for it. Okay, you can’t give me possibly what you owe me, ‘cause that’s way too much, but you can start with an apology. Just by like [saying], “You know what, dude? That was my bad.”

DX: I thought – from an outsider’s perspective – that the apologetic gesture was gonna be the Hot Boys reunion.  he kinda got a little aggy actually when I went into my Hot Boys reunion questions.

Mannie Fresh: Well, I always did say that’s not happening. It was just a ploy; it was just something to make them look good at the time. It was like, okay, we saying this, but I’m like, “How are y’all saying this, and y’all not getting in touch with nobody about it?” It’s like asking somebody something in an interview and you don’t know how to dodge that question ‘cause the next question might be the same thing you asking me. Like, “Well, dude, okay, if it ain’t gonna be that, then how you gonna straighten out things with these people?” So the easiest way to get out of that is like, “Yeah, we working on it, we doing it.”

DX: So am I just reading too much into it, or was that on-stage reunion [in June] with Wayne at Bonnaroo a little awkward, a little uncomfortable?

Mannie Fresh: Nah, not really, because I still talk to [. I talked to dude like three days ago. I called him because he made a step that was so important to Hip Hop – I don’t know if you seen , where he’s telling the kids don’t do what he do, and the reason why he drunk syrup was because he thought [that since] we all grew up like that, we all grew up on , and he thought it was the cool thing to do, so that’s why he did it. And he understands now that there’s a lot of people that’s following dude and doing what he does. And he was being sincere. Like, he said some cool shit, and I was just like, “Wow.” So I called him myself and was like, “Hey dude, I’m proud of you. I’m super-proud of you for what you said and what you did.” Because, you know, if I said that during our little reign when we was there it was taken as like, “Dude, you soft. You being soft right now.” And I’m like, “Dude, this shit is real right now. It’s kids that do everything that we do.” I’m not saying like my credibility is shot, or even losing credibility, by telling you like, dude, this is only entertainment. Don’t get it twisted.

DX: Yeah, you would think that’d be obvious in 2011, but … [Laughs]

Mannie Fresh: Well, shit, look at how weird kids are dressing. That’s all it take is one kid to do something crazy and everybody got on stockings and a little bitty-ass shirt.

Mannie Fresh Breaks Down Approach To Working With Young Jeezy

DX: [Laughs] Oh, man. Well, I’m not gonna ask you any more Wayne shit. I know folks wanna know if you’re ever gonna produce anything for Wayne again, but shit, I wanna know if you’re ever gonna do anything for [Young] Jeezy or T.I. again too?

Mannie Fresh: I just sent some stuff to []. And … I love [. I think he’s a good artist, but it’s time for Jeezy to show growth. So, that’s kinda like where me and Jeezy bump heads at. And it’s supposed to be that, he’s supposed to have his opinion and I’m supposed to have my opinion, and we still can be friends and we still can hang out. But, basically what I see is – It’s like, if I present some songs to Jeezy, it’s not the songs that he’s looking for. He like, “Dude, I want that shit that’s like right now.” And I’m like, “Dude, but if you hired me to do something,” and I’m telling you, I’m like, “Hey bruh, I wanna give you what it sound like right now but it’s time for you to get on another train. You gotta show some growth.”

DX: That’s what I thought was so great about “And Then What.” Like, it was you and him. It was like a perfect blend.

Mannie Fresh: In all honesty, let me just tell you the situation, when “And Then What” was made Jeezy already had a street appeal, but “And Then What” put him on the national appeal. But then it was guys in the room going like, “Some of that shit that Mannie do is kinda corny, bruh. You a gangsta.” So when you hear that this is my six friends telling me, “You don’t need to do another one with him, because that ain’t really what you represent.” And I’m like, “Dude, that’s the song that everybody know. How you let somebody talk you out of [doing something else with me]?”

DX: Wow. Yeah, that’s shocking to hear. I’d think you’d want that over and over again.

Mannie Fresh: Dude, and on top of that, what I truly, truly love about Mannie Fresh [is] everybody accepts Mannie, ‘cause Mannie gonna keep it 100% Mannie. He ain’t gonna try to be nothing that’s not him. So, that’s why I think around the board Mannie Fresh works. Like, Mannie Fresh works with Asians, White folks, Black folks, whatever.

DX: I’m from Cincinnati, so I was raised on The Isley Brothers. [But] I was amazed though still that Mannie Fresh was the one that did [UGK’s]  .

Mannie Fresh: Yeah! And I’m so open to doing new stuff and trying out stuff, but in this era we have artists that’s like, “Man, I’m not gonna do nothing [different]. I’m gonna try to keep it safe.” And I’m like, “Dude, shit, how many songs can we have with fuckin’ hi-hats and snares?” This is gonna sound crazy, but it needs to be said: It’s a million songs that sound like Mannie did ‘em coming from the South. And that’s not me just patting myself on my back. It’s to the point of where I’m sick of hearing that shit. [Laughs] And I get kids that tell me all the time, young producers that’s like, “Man, I grew up on your style. Shit, I like everything you did: your snare rolls, your 808s that do notes and all that.” And I’m like, “Dude, I like that shit too, but I don’t wanna hear a whole album of that.” When people hired me to do that, it was for a single purpose. Like, okay, I’m making the single. But, if you had to have me make an album – and believe me, it’s work that I’ve turned down because now nobody don’t play they role. The artist wanna be the producer, the producer wanna be the artist, and it’s just like, dude, we can’t really get this done if you don’t let me do what I do, and vice versa.

DX: So, if you’re having these difficulties with I guess you can call ‘em the mainstream cats, what are you doing right now just to keep working?

Mannie Fresh: I deejay []. I deejay my ass off, dude. Like, I’m all over the place these days. That’s what I started from, and that’s where I’m at right now. And, the cool thing about the deejay game is it tells you everything that’s going on in music, what people liking. Before the Bonnaroo thing was sold as it was a reunion for me and Wayne, really I was hired to deejay at Bonnaroo. It just so happens he was there as well as me.

DX: Yeah, people don’t know Mannie Fresh been on them one’s and two’s since Jheri curls and John Stockton shorts. [Laughs]

Mannie Fresh: And I can tell you what’s super, super crazy to me right now: I’ve deejayed in New York maybe four or five times … and New York is the south now. [Laughs] It’s like, they don’t wanna hear nothing but southern songs. It is crazy, because I’m thinking like, I’m going to New York, I got all my gems, my Hip Hop classics, and you play some  and everybody looking at yo’ ass like, “What the fuck? Dude, play .” And that’s [like], Wow, what happened? … But you know what it is? It’s more so this generation ain’t concerned with nothing, they the now generation. They don’t wanna do no homework for nothing, they don’t wanna know nothing about the past, none of that shit.

DX: So, I mean, are you trying to groom like new cats? Are you even bothering with the youngn’s?

Mannie Fresh: There’s a young cat who I [been] doing some songs for – and he’s on the cipher [video] with Mystikal – the dude named The Show. He’s from New Orleans. He’s a very lyrical dude. He’s that dude of New Orleans. But, we sitting on the car, right? And  come on, and he was just like, “Man, what the fuck is that?” He was like, “That’s the noisiest, dumbest shit I’ve ever heard.” And I mean when I tell you he offended like four old school dudes [to the point where] they wanted to fight him – They was like, “What the fuck you mean, ‘What is that?’” [Laughs]

DX: [Laughs] Wow. You remember what song it was? Like, “Welcome To The Terrordome” or something?

Mannie Fresh: Yeah, it was like “Welcome To The Terrordome” or something and he was just like, “Man, what is all that noise and shit?” And I was like, “Dude, you never heard Public Enemy?” And he was just like, “Man, all the shit they made was just loud and crazy.” And I was just like, “Wow.”

DX: So final question: What’s the next step for Mannie Fresh; what’s on deck for your 25th year in the game?

Mannie Fresh: Well, my next step is – truthfully, I’m looking for that new generation in music. And I got a couple of little cats. And we gonna work from the bottom to the top. We gonna work hard at it. I think that’s the only way it’s gonna last. Not saying I wouldn’t take a deal, but I don’t need a deal. I’d rather work for it. And that’s my next step. I would love for it to be Mystikal, and , to start out with, but I’ve learned my lessons like … I’m passionate about this, and I don’t wanna wait for nobody. That’s where I’m at right now. I do not wanna wait for nobody, because time is passing me by. I’m older now, so I can’t sit around and say, Well, when you really ready, Mystikal, I’ma be ready. I’m like, “Dude, from all the response that people have given us from blogs and all that, that shit should make you ready.”

And what I’m saying is … there’s a lot of people that miss southern Hip Hop – the quality southern Hip Hop. They like, “What the fuck, dude, what are y’all doing? When are y’all putting these records out?” And believe me, I get bombarded with that question all the time. I could be in Burger King and it’ll be somebody that’s like, “Dude, what the fuck is wrong with you and Mystikal? What y’all doing?” And I’m like, “Dude, I’m ready to work.”

source: hiphopdx.com


Industry Tips & Advice: Consumer Merchandise Trends Today

Catherine Stellin is Vice President of Trends and Research at The Intelligence Group. The Intelligence Group assists companies like Target, Microsoft, and Warner Music Group with consumer and trend marketing research. In this clip, Stellin discusses the focus on digital sales today and how consumers today are just as inclined to purchase a ring tone when compared to purchasing a band’s t-shirt at a concert. Stellin also talks about the ideas of ownership and how those ideas affect consumer’s decisions in experimentation and self-expression.

Shoot Date: May 2006


Industry Tips & Advice: MUSIC PUBLISHING – AN OVERVIEW by Alan Korn

MUSIC PUBLISHING – AN OVERVIEW (Part 1 of )

This article is designed to give an overview of music publishing. Although the details can be less than fascinating, music publishing remains one of the most financially lucrative areas in the music business, and one of the few areas where artists can generate real money. As a result, it is particularly crucial for recording artists and songwriters to protect their publishing rights. The best way to start is to learn the basics of the music publishing business.

WHAT IS A MUSIC PUBLISHER?

Before the invention of the phonograph, songwriters earned income by relying on music publishers to sell sheet music of their songs. Even as radio and television replaced the piano in the parlor, music publishers continued to play an important role as popular singers continued to rely upon established songwriters to provide their material. However, with the advent of rock and roll (and especially the Beatles) popular recording artists began to write more of their own songs. Since that time, the music publishing industry has taken on a less important role. Nevertheless, music publishers continue to perform several important functions that you should be aware of.

WHAT DOES A MUSIC PUBLISHER DO?

Today, music publishers are concerned with administering copyrights, licensing songs to record companies and others, and collecting royalties on behalf of the songwriter. Some of the more important music publishing activities are listed below:

Mechanical Royalties
The term “mechanical royalties” initially referred to royalties paid whenever a song was reproduced by a mechanical device (remember that one of a copyright owner’s exclusive rights is the right to authorize the reproduction of their work). The term “mechanical royalties” was applied to the reproduction of songs in music boxes, player pianos rolls, and later, phonograph records. This term is still used, and “mechanical royalties” now refers to royalties paid for the reproduction of songs on CD, DAT, audiocassette, flexi-discs, musical greeting cards, and other devices sold on a “per unit” basis.

The amount of money a record company must pay for a mechanical license is generally set by the Copyright Royalty Tribunal. This rate is sometimes referred to as a “statutory” rate. The current statutory rate through December 31, 2007 is nine and one-tenth cent ($.091) per song. This means that a single song can generate up to $.91 cents for every 10 records sold. Unfortunately, it is record industry custom to pay only 75% of the statutory rate to new or moderately successful songwriters. This means that a typical songwriter without enormous clout would generate a little more than 68 cents for every 10 records sold. After the publisher collects this money from the record company and takes its share of the income, a songwriter may receive as little as half of this amount.

Foreign Monies
Foreign countries sometimes have different laws governing the collection and distribution of mechanical royalties. As a result, it is often necessary for publishers to enter into agreements with a foreign publisher (or “subpublishers”) to collect a songwriter’s mechanical royalties in that territory. After the subpublisher takes a cut (anywhere from 15% to 25%) the rest of this foreign income is divided between the publisher and the songwriter according to their agreement.

Synchronization Licenses
Whenever a song is used with a visual image, it is necessary to obtain a “synchronization” (or “synch”) license permitting the use of that song. Music publishers issue synch licenses to television advertisers, motion picture companies, video manufacturers and CD-Rom companies. A portion of this money (usually 1/2 the net proceeds) is paid to the songwriter.

Transcription Licenses
Because radio is not a visual medium, the use of a song as part of a radio commercial requires a separate license, known as a “transcription license.” Sometimes songwriters are able to negotiate provisions in their publishing contract preventing their songs from use in certain contexts, such as ads for alcohol, tobacco, political campaigns or other uses the songwriter may find offensive.

Print Licenses
Although sheet music sales have diminished over the years, many songs are still available in print form. These include books of songs by specific artists, instruction books or compilations of hits within a given genre (i.e., “100 Country Hits of All Time”). The music publisher issues print licenses and collects this income from the sheet music company, while the songwriter receives a small royalty derived from the sale of his or her song in print form.

Administration and Registration of Copyrights
Because music publishers generate money by licensing copyrighted compositions, they must also perform various administrative tasks involving copyright transfers and the registration of musical copyrights with the U.S. Copyright Office. Registering your copyright with the US Copyright Office provides added protection to copyright holders, and can permit the copyright owner to recover statutory damages of up to $100,000 and attorneys fees if the copyright is subsequently infringed.

Public Performance Royalties
A copyright owner also has the exclusive right to authorize the “public performance” of that work. This is why radio and television broadcasters must enter into licenses with performance rights organizations such as BMI, ASCAP and SESAC. These performance rights organizations collect income on behalf of songwriters and music publishers whenever a song is publicly broadcast. A future column of the Fine Print will discuss these performance rights organizations in more detail.

Even though music publishers do not collect this performance rights income, publishers remain entitled to 50% of the money received by BMI, ASCAP, SESAC and others. Publishers also register songs with these performance rights organizations.

“Song Plugging”
This obscure term refers to music bizzers who promote the compositions of others. This may involve convincing popular artists to cover your song, or convincing Disney to use your latest tune in their next animated feature.

Translations
Publishers may also authorize translations in order to generate income from cover versions of a particular song in foreign countries.

Obtaining a Record Deal
Music publishers are usually generally most in signing established songwriters or recording artists who write their own material. However, some publishers may be willing to sign new songwriters or bands without a record deal. If a publisher believes an undiscovered artist will one day sell lots of hit records, they may help the artist record demos and assist in trying to land a major record deal. If the artist gets signed, the music publisher will hope to see a reward for its investment in the form of mechanical royalties, public performance royalties and other derivative income. A publisher may even be willing to contribute to tour support or provide extra promotions money in order to generate future publishing income from record sales and airplay.

WHY CONSIDER A PUBLISHING DEAL?

The main reason is money. Music publishers may be willing to pay a substantial cash advance for a songwriter’s past, present or future material. In exchange, the publisher will own a percentage of that artist’s musical copyrights and keep a percentage of money these songs earn.

Of course, publishers are unlikely to pay an advance unless they believe they can make a profit on the deal. Like everyone else in the industry, music publishers are in the business of buying something of yours in order to sell it to others at a profit. Unfortunately, many artists do not realize how valuable their publishing rights are. The history of the music business is littered with sleazy promoters who paid pennies for songs that later generated millions in income.

Not every artist needs a publishing deal, and some artists may be better off by avoiding traditional publishing deal altogether. Many different publishing options may be available to an artist today. Some publishers may be willing to enter into a more limited “co-publishing” deal, and “administration” deals may be available for independent artists who seek to retain their valuable copyrights. The next column will look at each of these deals more closely.

Alan Korn
Law Office of Alan Korn
1840 Woolsey Street
Berkeley, CA 94703
Ph: (510) 548-7300
Fax: (510) 540-4821
aakorn@igc.org

SOURCE:

http://www.alankorn.com/articles/publishing_1.html


Music News: Red Cafe Says Shakedown Album Will Be Out In 2012.

It’s been a long road, but  insists his debut album, Shakedown,will be out at the top of 2012. The Brooklyn MC has been grinding since the early 2000s, and since 2005, has consistently landed notable singles on New York radio.

First, there was “Bling Blaow,” then “Paper Touchin’ ” in 2008. A year later, Red broke out with “Da Hottest in Da Hood,” and in 2010, he dropped “I’m Ill” with  and “Money, Money, Money” with .

On Wednesday’s (October 19) edition of  Red assured his fans that thanks to his current deal with Bad Boy Records, the album is on its way.

“I’m working on the album now with the Bad Boy team. [Bad Boy President] Harve [Pierre] and Puff, they in there with me, giving that support that I need to make a great album that I’ll be proud of,” the MC told Sway on the “RFL” couch.

Throughout his career, the raspy-voiced spitter has been through a number of record deals, including a few with Trackmasters, one with Mack 10′s Hoo-Bangin’ and a one-shot deal with Koch Records, where he dropped a collaborative album with DJ Envy in 2007.

After a couple of failed ventures and still no solo album in site, Red took matters into his own hands. “At that point, I just felt like I needed to grab the wheel and have control of my own destiny, because I’m goin’ into these record companies, and I’m thinking it’s good, and it’s not really good,” Red explained. “A lot of it, I blame myself too, because as a young guy coming into the game, you think when you get the deal, that’s the victory.”

His current single,  which features Rick Ross and Ryan Leslie, stands as an ode to independent women everywhere. If the growing popularity of the song is any indication, fans should have that LP in no time.

Until then, Red Café is remaining patient. “I was never frustrated,” he said of his musical journey. “I felt like my moment would come when it comes.”

source: mtvnews.com


Industry Tips & Advice: Seth Godin on the Music Business – Part 2

Seth Godin talks to Music Business Radio about the changing face of the music industry.


Quote Of The Day

A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.


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