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Sports: NBA Players To Play at The Obama Classic.

President Obama has set up the first ever “Obama Classic” B-Ball game! It will be played on Dec 12 in the D.C. area at an undecided location! Big name NBA (+WNBA) Stars (chart below) will play for Obama! Tickets will range from $100 to $5000 (purchase tickets), with proceeds going towards the Obama Victory FundObama Victory Fund is a joint fund-raising committee that supports both President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign and the Democratic National Committee. – 

Confirmed to play:

Ray Allen – Carmelo Anthony – Chris Bosh – Vince Carter – Tyson 
Chandler – Jamal Crawford – Kevin Durant – Baron Davis – Patrick Ewing – Derek 
Fisher – Rudy Gay – Blake Griffin – Tyler Hansbrough – Dwight Howard – Juwan 
Howard – Antawn Jamison – Dahntay Jones – Brandon Knight – Kevin Love – Jamal 
Mashburn – Cheryl Miller – Reggie Miller – Alonzo Mourning – Dikembe Mutombo – 
Chris Paul – Quentin Richardson – Doc Rivers – Steve Smith – Jerry Stackhouse – 
Amare Stoudemire – Tina Thompson – John Wall – Russell Westbrook

source: thatsenuff.com


Sports: Ryan Braun Snags NL MVP

Milwaukee Brewers Ryan Braun beat out LA Dodgers Matt Kemp for the NL MVP Award on Tuesday! He took 20 of the 32 first-place votes from the Baseball Writers Association of America. Braun helped guide the Brewers to their first division title in 30 years and a franchise best 96 wins. He also became the first Brewer to win the MVP award since Robin Yount in 1989. He led the NL with a .597 Slugging %, 77 extra-base hits, and was a contender in almost every category: (.332) batting average, 33 HR’s, 111 RBI’s, 109 Runs scored, and 33 Stolen Bases. He beat out Kemp (chart below), who was chasing the triple crown leading the NL in HR’s (39) and RBI’s (126), but ending up third in batting average (.324). Kemp also won a gold-glove.

“I’m not going to pretend like I wasn’t anxious or nervous because I was,” said Braun, who was sitting on the balcony of his home in Malibu, Calif., when he received the call that he had won. “I was obviously thrilled, excited. It’s honestly difficult to put into words how much this means to me.” – espn

NL MVP Voting
Team    Player Points
Ryan Braun,  Brewers   388
Matt Kemp,    Dodgers  332


Sports: Will Mayweather Finally Fight Pacquiao?

Floyd Mayweather Jr. (crew) got on the mic, Wednesday, to announce May 5 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas as his next fight date! He added that it will be the “biggest fight of his career”! He didn’t announce his opponent, but hinted towards Manny Pacquiao. Mayweather just unleashed the 1-2 on his last victim, Victor Ortiz, in the controversial Sept 17 bout. Pacquiao has a bout on Nov 12 at the MGM Grand against Juan Manuel Marquez for the third time. Mayweather no drug tests this time.. lol.

Mayweather’s opponent has not been determined but advisor Leonard Ellerbe said, “We’re looking to make the biggest fight possible and everyone knows what that fight is, the little fella.” – espn


Sports: Giants Improve To 5-2


The NY Giants rallied their way to a 20-17 victory over the Miami Dolphins, yesterday! The Giants seemed to have problems in the red-zone, until the fourth quarter, when Eli finally connected with WR Victor Cruz (pic above) on a 25-yard TD pass to take the lead. The Giants D was ferocious in the fourth quarter to help seal the deal! The Giants increased their record to 5-2, while the Dolphins dropped to 0-7! Check out the


Sports: N.B.A. Talks Break Off, Threatening November Games By HOWARD BECK

Negotiations to end the N.B.A. lockout collapsed again Thursday night, in spectacular fashion, with more acrimony, mistrust and fiery rhetoric, and despite the involvement of a federal mediator.

The talks ended around 7 p.m., after nearly 30 hours spent over three days at a Manhattan hotel. It is the third time this month that the owners and the players have walked away from each other with a feeling that they could not move any further.

The last breakdown led to the cancellation of the first two weeks of the season. This one guarantees that another two weeks — the balance of the November schedule — will be wiped out soon.

“We were unable to bridge the gap,” Adam Silver, the N.B.A. deputy commissioner, said about 30 minutes after the parties separated. He added, “We’re saddened on behalf of the game.”

No additional meetings are scheduled, and the federal mediator, George Cohen, has effectively withdrawn from the process.

Although Cohen said he would be available if talks were to resume, he issued a bleak assessment, saying in a statement, “No useful purpose would be served by requesting the parties to continue the mediation process at this time.”

The finality was somewhat surprising, given the modest progress that league officials and the players union had made this week, with Cohen’s assistance.

The sides narrowed the gap on a proposed split of revenue, with the N.B.A. offering a 50-50 split, and the players reducing their request to 52.5 percent. But that gap represents about $100 million in today’s terms, and $1 billion over the life of a 10-year deal, which the owners are seeking.

“The players were not prepared to make the move we thought was necessary,” said Silver, who was leading the N.B.A. contingent in place of Commissioner David Stern, who was ill.

Silver’s implication set off union leaders, who said it was the owners who essentially issued an ultimatum — 50-50 or nothing — and called off the talks.

“I want to make it clear that you guys were lied to earlier,” said Derek Fisher, the president of the players union, adding, “They’re interested in telling you one-sided stories that are not true.”

Fisher said that the players “continued to express our willingness to negotiate,” but that the owners refused to budge — or to discuss other issues — without the union’s acceding to the 50-50 split.

The parties had made some progress on a number of smaller items, like the midlevel exception, adjustments to the rookie-scale system and a so-called amnesty provision that would allow teams to waive players to clear salary-cap room.

They spent about 24 hours in a 32-hour span between Tuesday and Wednesday, including a 16-hour session.

Silver said he began the day feeling optimistic. Officials from the players’ side also felt that progress was possible when the talks reconvened early Thursday afternoon, after the N.B.A.’s board of governors meeting.

Union officials suggested that something changed during that owners’ meeting. According to the union, Paul Allen, the Portland Trail Blazers’ owner, was a surprise participants at the labor talks, and had been sent to deliver the owners’ message — that they would move no further.

“This meeting was hijacked,” said Jeffrey Kessler, the union’s outside counsel and their lead negotiator. “Something happened in that board of governors meeting. We were making progress.”

Allen was sent, Kessler said, to deliver a message from the board of governors — “And that view was, ‘Our way or the highway.’ That’s what we were told. We were shocked. We went in there trying to negotiate, and they came in and they said, ‘You either accept 50-50 or we’re done, and we won’t discuss anything else.’ Something happened in that board of governors meeting.”

Kessler spoke long after league officials had departed. The N.B.A. did not immediately respond to his remarks.

The talks took place without Stern, who was ill with flulike symptoms. He communicated with Silver and Peter Holt, the chairman of the N.B.A.’s labor committee, by phone throughout the day.

Stern’s absence was noteworthy but not a major setback; Silver has been the N.B.A.’s point person in negotiations all along.

The board of governors meeting was mostly spent discussing a new revenue-sharing plan, which has been developed on a separate but parallel track from the collective bargaining agreement.

The plan is somewhat dependent on the new labor deal, but Silver reiterated that the revenue-sharing pool would be tripled, to at least $150 million per year, and quadrupled in later seasons.

Although the details remained confidential, the league’s poorest franchises could receive up to $15 million a year under the new revenue-sharing formula, according to a person who has seen the plan. The two biggest payers would be the Los Angeles Lakers, who are expected to contribute $50 million a year, and the Knicks, who are expected to contribute $30 million a year.

The owners’ revenue-sharing plan will not be completed, Silver said, until they know what the new revenue split with the players will be.

“One is dependent on the other,” Silver said, because the collective bargaining agreement sets out how much each team will spend on player salaries. Silver added, “We need to know how much we’re going to need to supplement a large number of our teams to bring them to break even or profitability.”

SOURCE:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/21/sports/basketball/nba-talks-proceed-in-commissioner-david-stern-absence.html


Sports: Common and Derrick Rose Premiere The New Adidas adiZero Rose 2

Derrick Rose hooked up with Chicago rap star Common on Saturday in Chicago to celebrate the launch of his new adidas shoe, the adiZero Rose 2.
Rose signed autographs at a local Foot Locker and then headed to the James Jordan Boys & Girls Club for the “Run with D Rose” event.
Common and DRose were among the players who took part in a 3-on-3 tournament against Facebook fans.
Other notable rap figures in attendance included DJ Neil Armstrong, DJ Mick Boogie, and DJ Araab.
allhiphop.com


Sports: 52 Year Old Dewey Bozella Who Was Wrongfully Convicted, and Recently Freed After 26 Years, Lives Out His Dream To Fight Professionally and Wins In The Process.


Dewey Bozella landed a hard right cross on his opponent’s jaw at the final bell, and the 52-year-old boxer raised his arms in victory.

After 26 years behind bars for a murder he didn’t commit, Bozella triumphantly realized a dream deferred in his first and only professional fight.

Bozella won his pro boxing debut Saturday night, beating Larry Hopkins by unanimous decision in the latest stunning chapter of a remarkable life.
Dewey Bozella raises his arms in the fourth round of a boxing match with Larry Hopkins in Los Angeles. Bozell, 52, won his debut by unanimous decision after 26 years wrongfully in prison.
“I used to lay in my cell and dream about this happening,” Bozella said. “It was all worth it. It was my dream come true.”

Bozella caught the eye of Golden Boy Promotions, which is promoting the Oct. 15 card, after his life was chronicled in July on ESPN’s annual ESPY Award show. Bozella was honored with the Arthur Ashe Courage Award on the show.


Last round and interview:

Wrongfully convicted of killing 92-year-old Emma Crapser in 1983, Bozella earned two college degrees and became the light heavyweight champion of Sing Sing before he was exonerated in 2009.

Golden Boy fulfilled Bozella’s dream by putting him on the undercard of Bernard Hopkins’ bout with Chad Dawson. His victory, punctuated by that devastating punch to Larry Hopkins’ head at the final bell, brought the crowd to its feet.

“This was my first and last fight,” said Bozella, who lives in Newburgh, N.Y. “It’s a young man’s game. I did what I wanted to do, and I’m happy. I appreciate everybody that made this possible. This has been one of the greatest experiences of my life.”

Despite a complete lack of physical evidence, Bozella was convicted of killing Crapser on her way home after a night out playing bingo. He maintained his innocence throughout a quarter-century behind bars, even turning down a plea-bargain offer in 1990 that would have required admitting guilt, until his conviction was overturned.

Bozella battered the winless Hopkins throughout the second half of their four-round fight. Hopkins, no relation to Bernard Hopkins, also lost points for losing his mouthpiece six times in the final round, apparently exhausted and unable to match Bozella’s conditioning.

“This guy is an incredible athlete, a remarkable man,” said Bernard Hopkins, the 46-year-old light heavyweight champion who trained with Bozella in recent weeks. “I spent five years in the penitentiary, but not for something I didn’t do. We understand what it takes to overcome your circumstances. Unless you’ve done it, you can’t understand it. I have all respect for what Dewey has done with his life.”

Bozella’s Relentlessness Wins Out Again
All along, Dewey Bozella’s message to anyone who would listen was this: Never give up. On Saturday, in his first and only pro fight, he again practiced what he has preached, willing himself to a win, writes Cal Fussman. Story

Bozella didn’t have a younger man’s hand speed, but he moved with a confident ease and showed strong technique in the ring, constantly moving his head and outmaneuvering Larry Hopkins. Both cruiserweights absorbed big shots in the first two rounds, but Bozella was never hurt beyond a welt near his left eye.

Bozella dominated the fourth round, even finishing the final seconds in style. After Hopkins spit his mouthpiece into the air and flailed at it with his boxing gloves, Bozella decked him with a right cross at the bell, leaving Hopkins woozy on the ropes.

With his family and friends gathered around him in the ring, Bozella raised his gloves in victory when the judges favored him 39-36, 38-37 and 38-36.

Bozella has never lived without tragedy. His father beat his pregnant mother to death when he was 9 years old, and two of his brothers were murdered on the Brooklyn streets.

Four months after he moved to Poughkeepsie, N.Y., in 1977, he was suspected of killing Crapser, but not indicted by a grand jury. Bozella cleaned up a life of petty crime and embraced boxing at a gym run by former heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson, but he was arrested and convicted of Crapser’s murder in December 1983 on the strength of false testimony from other convicts.

Bozella’s story attracted the attention of Oscar De La Hoya and his business associates, who arranged for Bozella to fight in Los Angeles after he passed the California State Athletic Commission’s fitness requirements.

Although the crowd loved Bozella’s fight, he said he had “done what I needed to do.” He hopes to spend his life training fighters in Newburgh.

“I’m going to concentrate on the Dewey Bozella Foundation, which really means opening a gym in my town,” Bozella said. “Because there are no gyms, and I’d like to see kids who are on the street have something productive to do. No more fighting for me.”

Arthur Ashe speech by Dewey Bozella
source: espn


Sports: Lebron Tweeted About Joining NFL… See What Some NFL Players Had To Say About That.

“I recommend he keep his NBA contract and just play the Madden video games if he misses football”said Bengals CB Leon Hall.

“The mentally weakest person I’ve ever seen”, said Lions linebacker Chris Spielman.

“I think LeBron has a better chance of making the NFL and being an impact player than Michael Jordan had of making it in Double-A baseball,” Spielman said. “I’d pay money to see him run routes.

“There’s no doubt, physically, that he has the skills.”

“He could be a tight end that doesn’t have to block,” Bengals Safety Chris Crocker said“He’s very athletic. You see basketball players make the transition. Antonio Gates and Jermichael Finley, those guys play tight end. If he can catch, he could be a pretty good tight end.” – 


Sports: Carmelo Anthony Hints At Another Charity Game, But This One To Be Played In NYC.

After Saturday’s exhibition dubbed “South Florida All-Star Classic” made fans want more, and the NBA season seems losing games, day by day; ‘Melo decided to amp up the next big (exhibition) game and bring it back to NYC! LBJ, Stat, CP3, ‘Melo, and other stars could light up the Big Apple, and give back to NYC! Check out Melo’s twitter from yesterday (Monday), his interview with the NY Post after the Saturday exhibition, and some video below!

“Working on an epic exhibition charity game in NYC,” he wrote“Showtime. I’m  comin’ home.”

NY Post Interview:

“We’re going to keep giving back,” Anthony said.

“We had conversations,” Anthony told The Post“It was just good to get  everybody together.

“I don’t think anything is going to happen between now and Monday,” Anthony  added“So we’ve just got to be prepared for that, be prepared for the lockout  for the first two weeks and see where all this is going.”

“It’s sad all the way across,” said Anthony, who scored 30 points for victorious  Team Wade and hit the game-tying 3-pointer with two seconds left to send the  game into overtime. “It’s [sad] for us as players. It’s sad for the owners. It’s  sad for the fans of the NBA.”

“If they want to lock us out [longer tan two weeks], we’re sticking together,”  Anthony said“It’s Saturday. Let’s be realistic. I don’t think anything is  going to happen between now and Monday.” –  source: www.thatsenuff.com


Sports: NBA Lockout takes off first 2 weeks of the NBA schedule BY: ERIC KANCHUGER

When the lock out started at the end of the NBA post season, no one thought the NBA 2011-2012 season would be shortened. With no collective bargaining agreement over months basketball fans would fear more and more of the 2011-2012 season being jeopardized. Now at October 10th, November is just around the corner. (Nov. 1 being the opening night.)

David Stern unfortunately moments ago had to already cancel the first 2 weeks of the NBA season ; To make bad news even worst Stern said “ that both the owners and the NBA are “both on very far apart issues” making the end to this lock out look nowhere close and the cancelation of even more weeks of the NBA season very likely.

Though fans across the nation and even the world are disappointed with the cancellation of the first 2 weeks, there is a problem in the NBA that has to be fixed for the better good. Obviously fans of big markets team are devastated by the lock out. From the other perspective fans from small market areas will not have to worry about their superstars and favorite players leaving their city to go join a super team like LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony and multiple others have done in roughly the past year.

SOURCE:

http://channel6newsonline.com/2011/10/nba-lockout-takes-off-first-2-weeks-of-the-nba-schedule/


Sports: First two weeks of NBA season likely to be cancelled if lockout is not lifted by Monday by Wil Longbottom

The NBA has today cancelled the remainder of the preseason and could axe the first two weeks of the regular season if a labor dispute is not resolved by next week.

Players and NBA team owners have failed to make progress after four hours of negotiations and no further meetings have been set up.

If an agreement is not reached by Monday, both sides stand to to lose millions of dollars and potentially countless fans if the start of the regular season is interrupted.
Shut out: Dallas Mavericks' Dirk Nowitzki shoots during the NBA finals against the Miami Heat. The first two weeks of this season could be canceled because of a labor disputeShut out: Dallas Mavericks’ Dirk Nowitzki shoots during the NBA finals against the Miami Heat. The first two weeks of this season could be canceled because of a labor dispute

Commissioner David Stern said: ‘We’re ready to meet and discuss any subject anyone wants to talk about.

‘We’d like not to lose the first two weeks of the season, but it doesn’t look good.’

At issue is the amount money players make from the basketball-relative income through a collective bargaining agreement.

Owners offered the players a 50-50 revenue split, but the players’ association rejected that deal.

That is still well below the 57 per cent that players were guaranteed under the previous agreement, but more than the 47 per cent union officials said was formally proposed.

Players had offered to lower their demands to 53 per cent, which they said would give owners back more than $1billion over six years, but won’t cut it further at the moment.

No deal: Los Angeles Lakers player Derek Fisher speaks alongside fellow players after the NBA labor meetings collapsed yesterdayNo deal: Los Angeles Lakers player Derek Fisher speaks alongside fellow players after the NBA labor meetings collapsed yesterday

Derek Fisher, president of the players’ association, said: ‘We were not able to get close enough to close the gap.’

With superstars like Kobe Bryant, Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett, the players’ proposal would have made up around $200 million per season – a sizeable chunk of the $300million owners said they lost last season.

Both sides are also still divided on the salary-cap structure.

Training camps were postponed and 43 preseason games scheduled for October 9 – 15 were canceled last month.

The NBA regular season is due to start on November 1.

Owners have insisted on the ability to turn a profit after the league said 22 of its 30 teams lost money last season.

Mr Fisher added: ‘We want to and have been willing to negotiate, but we find ourselves at a point today where we in some ways anticipated or expected to be, faced with a lockout that may jeopardize portions if not all of our season.’
Star: NBA's Kobe Bryant makes a sponsor's appearance in Milan, Italy. He has said it is 'very possible' he could play in Italy while the lockout continuesStar: NBA’s Kobe Bryant makes a sponsor’s appearance in Milan, Italy. He has said it is ‘very possible’ he could play in Italy while the lockout continues

Without a deal, the battle could go to the courts.

The players have been ‘locked out’ of teams since July 1 when talks first collapsed.

Several high-profile players have said they will play overseas if the 82-game season is cancelled or delayed.

The only time the NBA has cancelled regular season games was when a work stoppage reduced the 1998-1999 season to 50.

It comes after a similar dispute threatened to delay the start of the NFL season.

The collective bargaining agreement was unanimously discontinued by NFL owners in March, sparking a lock out until the end of July.

Eventually a new agreement was reached on July 21, and the only game that was canceled was the Pro Football Hall of Fame Game on August 7.
SOURCE:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2045505/NBA-Lockout-2011-First-2-weeks-season-likely-cancelled.html?ito=feeds-newsxml


Sports: NBA Lockout Cancels Preseason, Threatens Season by Kenneth Quinnell

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCivvDm3BA8&feature=player_embedded

Labor negotiations between National Basketball Association owners and players broke down Tuesday, leading to the . The owners have locked out the players since July 1 as the two sides were unable to reach a new collective bargaining agreement and owners are demanding a decrease in the percentage of revenue that goes to player salaries. Players are currently guaranteed 57 percent of revenue and the owners have demanded that percentage fall to 46 or 47 percent. David Stern and other league negotiators offered a 50-50 split that was rejected by the players, who have offered to decrease their percentage to 53 percent.

Some may wonder why anyone should care about what percentage of league revenues go to the players and ask why we should care about one group of millionaires arguing over money with another group of millionaires. There are several reasons. First is that the money in question rightfully belongs to the players. The players do all the work and fans universally come to see the players. The whole league is based on the interest of fans in the efforts of the players. What do the owners add to the situation? Virtually nothing and they already get 43 percent of the revenue for that. Now they demand the majority of the money despite adding little to nothing to the product.

More importantly, in the bigger picture, is that the labor battles in professional sports are the highest profile labor battles in the country and they are an introduction for most Americans to the concept of unions and workers rights. Positive coverage of players unions can translate to positive feelings towards other unions and vice versa. Accurately showing the public the greed of team owners and how they exploit the labor of the players can help people understand that the same types of situations exist where workers don’t make millions of dollars.

And there is the fact that these same owners, as pointed out by , take public money to build arenas and then pocket all the profits without giving anything back to the government that financed them in the first place.

Owners complain about their teams losing money, but the reality is that they aren’t losing money because of player salaries as much as they are losing it because of their own bad business decisions. As Ziller points out:

No, if the NBA is truly losing money, it’s because other expenses are growing faster than revenue. The league refuses to discuss those other expenses, of course. Interest payments on team purchases — you know, the interest Robert Sarver is paying to finance his record-breaking purchase of the Suns — is a big chunk. That whole racket has become a self-perpetuating scandal that ensures that non-payroll expenses increase for eternity. The values of NBA teams as properties will continue to rise, and the players (through lockout-forced rollbacks) and fans (through higher prices and worse service) will be forced to help finance those deals. But when Sarver sells the Suns, when Chris Cohan sells the Warriors, do those players and fans get cut in? Nope. They’re left helping the next guy finance the takeover.

 


Sports: African American NHL player Faces Racism.

Racism is a strong word, but actions ill led token racism; prejudices unresolved, and poor teachings enable it. I can’t believe that in 2011, a strange ‘elusive’ hockey fan would throw a banana at a black man playing in the NHL! He loves the game, and must have talent to make it that far. Wayne Simmonds was traded from the L.A. Kings to the Philadelphia Flyers. He was playing in a shoot-out following an exhibition game in London, Ontario when the incident took place. He made his shot, and didn’t make a thing out of it, so I guess he is the better man. Check it out!

“I’ve never had a banana thrown at me before. That’s a first for me,” Simmonds, 23, said“I guess it’s something I obviously have to deal with, being a black player playing a predominantly white sport.”

“At first, I thought ‘I better get another shot if I miss,’ “ Simmonds said. “But I did score, so that was good.”He had the only goal in the shootout for the Flyers, who lost the game 4-3.

“I’ve grown a lot playing in this league and throughout my whole life,” he said“I’m not going to dwell on that. It’s over with now.” – 


Sports: NBA, union staffers set meeting; formal session may follow by Sam Amick

With time running out for the start of the NBA season to be saved, the labor talks will resume on Wednesday in New York.

According to a source close to the situation, staff members from both sides will convene for a meeting that doesn’t qualify as a bargaining session but could be followed by a formal negotiating session on Thursday.

Wednesday’s session will not include NBA commissioner David Stern, any owners, National Basketball Players’ Association executive director Billy Hunter or union president Derek Fisher. NBPA attorney Ron Klempner and attorneys for the NBA are expected to attend, and it remains unclear whether deputy commissioner Adam Silver will also take part.

While the two sides have made significant progress on the economic front in negotiations, the systematic disagreements remain. Hunter deemed the owners’ insistence on a hard salary cap a “blood issue” after talks stalled on Sept. 13 in New York, but after the Board of Governors meeting in Dallas last Thursday, Stern said that everything was negotiable.

As such, one source said a follow-up meeting Thursday involving Stern and Hunter could indicate progress, as the union had made it known that future discussions were only warranted if the owners showed some willingness to budge on that key issue.

SOURCE:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/sam_amick/09/20/nba.labor.meeting/


Sports: Giants Beat The Rams To Even Out Their Record.

CBS News: Steve Spagnuolo and the St. Louis Rams came to the Meadowlands bearing gifts and the New York Giants readily accepted them.
Eli Manning threw two touchdown passes and linebacker Michael Boley scored on a 65-yard fumble return to lead New York to a 28-16 victory over the mistake-prone Rams on Monday night in the first matchup between Giants coach Tom Coughlin and Spagnuolo, his former defensive coordinator.

This one was ugly with mistakes by the Rams (0-2) giving New York (1-1) a crucial win after a disappointing loss to Washington in the season opener.

All four of New York’s touchdowns resulted directly from St. Louis mistakes.

Manning hit Hakeem Nicks with a 3-yard TD pass after a muffed punt and Domenik Hixon made a spectacular juggling grab on a 22-yard score after a busted coverage late in the first half.

Sam Bradford threw a touchdown pass and Josh Brown kicked three short field goals for the Rams, who moved up and down the field except in the red zone.

Bradford might have made the biggest mistakes, throwing a pass backward and seeing Boley run it into the end zone.

It was that kind of night for the Rams.

The Rams killed themselves in the red zone. They settled for three short field goals after drives stalled inside the Giants 10, with the first coming after they got a first-and-goal at the 1 following a 68-yard catch and run by Danario Alexander.

New York built a 21-6 halftime lead and was never threatened again.

After Manning threw an interception deep in Rams’ territory on the opening drive, the Giants looked lost for a couple of minutes, until the Rams woke them up with their first big mistake.

It resulted because St. Louis was without regular punt returner Danny Amendola.

Greg Salas took his place and muffed Steve Weatherford’s punt with Dave Tollefson recovering at the 38.

Nicks, who was questionable for the game with a bruised knee, put New York ahead with the 3-yard TD catch. The score came after New York got a first down at the Rams’ 9 after Bradley Fletcher was called for pass interference against Nicks.

A 25-yard field goal by Brown closed the gap to 7-6 later in the quarter, and the Rams seemed to be in position to take the lead early in the second quarter when Bradford moved them to the Giants 27.

However on third-and-8, Bradford tried to throw a halfback screen to Williams who was lined up as a receiver. The pass was thrown backward, making it a lateral and Boley picked up the fumble and ran 65 yards for a touchdown and a 14-6 lead.

The margin grew to 21-6 just before halftime when cornerback Al Harris let Mario Manningham run past him on a first-and-10 from the Giants 47 and Manning hit him in stride for a 31-yard gain.

Hixon made a one-handed catch of Manning’s pass — juggling the ball three times with his right hand — for a 22-yard touchdown. He seemed to hurt his right knee on the play and barely played in the second half. He missed all last season after tearing the ACL in his right knee in June.

A 17-yard pass interference penalty against Justin King kept the Giants’ opening drive in the second half alive and Jacobs scored one play after Manning got New York a first down with a 23-yard screen pass to Ahmad Bradshaw.

Bradford closed the scoring with a 19-yard touchdown pass to Alexander late in the third quarter.


Sports: Mayweather Gets No Respect For His Win. Should Be Ashamed Of Himself.

Mayweather is infamous for throwing elbows so what’s the big deal if he gets a headbutt thrown his way right? Apparently Mayweather couldn’t take a taste of his own medicine, so during a break issued by the referee and a effort to make good from Ortiz, Mayweather decided to take two cheapshots at Victor Ortiz. Hands down and not ready Victor Ortiz was knocked out and couldn’t get up. In which the ref called the fight and appointed Floyd Mayweather the winner by TKO.
So let’s just do a small recap… Ortiz fights dirty he loses a point Mayweather fights ridiculously dirty and he gets the belt. Last time i will ever watch a boxing fight again. A main reason why the sport of boxing is going down.
Larry Merchant said it best “If i was 50 years younger i would kick your ass”

Article written by Ray Reyes of Get It Done Entertainment


Sports: Floyd MayWeather VS Victor Ortiz…

So begins our marathon coverage of one of the biggest fights of 2011, Floyd Mayweather vs. Victor Ortiz on Sept. 17. Now: The stakes of Mayweather-Ortiz. Next: Get to know Ortiz.

In the proxy war with his chief rival for the dual title of boxing’s best fighter and biggest superstar, Floyd Mayweather’s third parties in the last two years have been more formidable than those of Manny Pacquiao. Last May, Mayweather fought the last vestiges of a viable Shane Mosley; this May, Pacquiao fought a further decomposed version of Mosley. This weekend, Mayweather will fight Victor Ortiz, the legitimate #2 welterweight in the world behind only Pacquiao. In November, Pacquiao will fight Juan Manuel Marquez, the lightweight champion, at 144 lbs. — more than two years after Mayweather did the same thing, in a victory that (rightfully) no one at the time gave Mayweather any credit for whatsoever.

But those are mere battles. The real war? That’s one that Pacquiao is winning.

Because the two have yet to fight and show no signs of ever doing so, some in boxing, myself among them, have taken to evaluating each of their separate fights on their own merits. What’s the point in spending nearly two years — and it’s been that long since Mayweather vs. Pacquiao became a point of discussion and negotiation — wringing hands over the most depressing, damning storyline in boxing? But as much time as we’ll spend in this space this week breaking down Mayweather-Ortiz, we’d be remiss in our praise of Mayweather for fighting Ortiz compared to Pacquaio for fighting Marquez if we left out one very important thing:

Mayweather himself is the chief obstacle to Mayweather vs. Pacquiao.

Why Mayweather-Ortiz Trumps Pacquiao-Marquez III

At the risk of repeating myself, Mayweather (pictured above on the left) vs. Ortiz (on the right) is simply the much, much more defensible fight. Statistically, bettors see them as very similar. But one man is fighting a fresh, young welterweight contender. The other is fighting the overall better boxer, but a 38-year-old who is moving up two full weight classes in a division where he’s a proven failure.

Ortiz is the better opponent of the two. If Ortiz and Marquez fought at welterweight, I’d pick Ortiz to win fairly easily. If Marquez fought a welterweight who could barely crack the top 20, I’d pick the welterweight. The size issue is that defining. At his one welterweight fight, Marquez was impotent. He was as slow as a mud slide, which made the already-difficult task of hitting Mayweather even harder. And when he did connect, Mayweather literally laughed at him, so feeble were his punches at the weight.

Say what you will about the size difference between Pacquiao and Marquez being negligible on fight night; there wasn’t much difference between Mayweather and Marquez, either, I suspect, and besides, all sizes aren’t equal, even when they’re equal. Some fighters can weigh the same as their opponent but not be the same size as them. Observe how ineffective Ricky Hatton was at 147 lbs. after ruling 140 lbs. for several years. Pacquiao is comfortable at welterweight. Marquez is useless.

Some have argued that, stylistically, Marquez has shown in his two previous fights with Pacquiao that he knows how to exploit Pacquiao’s weaknesses. But the Pacquiao of 2011 is leagues better and multi-dimensional than the Pacquiao of 2008; Marquez, in the interim, has only declined. Stylistically, Ortiz has his own argument for being able to beat Mayweather, who has been troubled by southpaws and quick opponents. He might have no more chance of using a favorable style to beat Mayweather than Marquez does to beat Pacquiao. He just doesn’t have the handicaps of size or age that Marquez does.

There are reasons to be interested in Pacquiao-Marquez III outside of how defensible the match-up is, like the history of bad blood between the two getting a decisive conclusion. The are reasons not to be interested in Mayweather-Ortiz outside of how defensible the match-up is, like finding Mayweather to be a distasteful character. But as match-ups go, Mayweather-Ortiz trumps Pacquiao-Marquez III.

Why Mayweather Is To Blame For Mayweather-Pacquiao Not Happening

There are several different whys, even. Most objective journalists have pointed the finger at Mayweather, overall, with Mayweather loyalists the only people really pointing at Pacquiao. Originally, I was willing to spread the blame around a little more. But over time, it’s become increasingly obvious that Mayweather is the guilty party.

The first reason: In late 2009, Mayweather insisted on a blood testing regime that he had no basis for insisting upon and that was without precedent. Whatever his personal suspicions about Pacquiao taking steroids, there is no evidence of Pacquiao taking steroids and no credible allegation from anyone with knowledge that he did. He basically invented a contract demand based on faith, or, if you want to be generous, reasonable assumption. Mayweather is entitled to insist upon any contract terms he wants. But he was asking for something that boxers had not asked for before from a future opponent, and that kind of unique demand means that the party that turns it down is less culpable. After all, Pacquiao was only doing what usually happens in fight negotiations. If Mayweather hadn’t raised this unprecedented contract term, the fight would have happened in 2010.

The second reason: In mid-2010, all indicators are that Mayweather walked away from a deal to fight Pacquiao. His adviser, Al Haymon, had negotiated with Pacquiao’s promoter, Top Rank, using HBO’s Ross Greenburg as an intermediary. Mayweather’s other adviser Leonard Ellerbe denied those negotiations took place and that there never was any deal. Greenburg — an objective party in the dispute — publicly said negotiations did take place. Since Ellerbe was lying about whether negotiations happened and Top Rank’s Bob Arum was not, there is every reason to believe that when Arum said he believed he had a deal with Haymon, Arum was telling the truth about that, too.

The third reason: Mayweather shifts the contract demands every time Pacquiao agrees to them. Originally, Mayweather’s team said they could live with a 14-day window right before the fight where no blood testing would be conducted. When Pacquiao agreed to that, Mayweather decided to take 14 days off the table. When Pacquiao lifted all objections to blood testing prior to the fight, Mayweather insisted that Pacquiao must be tested in the United States only — something that Mayweather knew would never happen because Pacquiao trains for part of his camp in the Philippines. If Pacquiao agrees to move his entire camp to the United States, wanna bet Mayweather doesn’t come up with yet another unprecedented contract demand?

What Mayweather-Ortiz Instead Of Mayweather-Pacquiao Means

Mayweather is fighting a legitimate opponent Saturday night. He has fought a lot of them in recent years: Shane Mosley, Ricky Hatton, Oscar De La Hoya, Carlos Baldomir, Zab Judah. He’s fought some bad ones, too. But his recent run of competition is better than Pacquiao’s.

That’s not to say there aren’t some major similarities between their competition. Both got to the highest level of the sport fighting and defeating top-notch opponents. But once they got there, they stopped fighting the best available and started fighting something less than that; often, a big name that was compromised in some major way, either by age or wear or weight.

The last time Mayweather fought the best available opponent was in 2002, when he took on top lightweight Jose Luis Castillo in a rematch. Once he moved to junior welterweight, he fought Henry Bruseles, DeMarcus Corley and Arturo Gatti instead of the far better Miguel Cotto, Ricky Hatton or Kostya Tszyu. Once he moved to welterweight, he fought Hatton over his best weight, Marquez over his best weight, Mosley over his best age, Baldomir and Sharmba Mitchell instead of the better likes of a younger version of Mosley, Cotto, Antonio Margarito or Paul Williams.

Pacquiao has taken a similar path since 2010, at no point fighting the best available opponent.

But there’s a major difference.

Pacquiao tried to fight the best available opponent: Mayweather. Mayweather didn’t try to fight the best available opponent: Pacquiao.

I’m interested in Mayweather-Ortiz, out of context. It’s an intriguing match-up in many ways, some of which I’ll describe further in future posts.

But at the very heart of the matter, it’s a reflection of boxing failing its fans that we still don’t have Mayweather-Pacquiao. And more than anyone, that’s on Mayweather.
source: www.queensbury-rules.com


Sports: Michael Jordan Fined 100K

MJ walking on egg-shells. Breaking News: The NBA has fined Michael Jordan $100K for public comments he made about the lock-out and one of the league’s players. In an Aug. 19 interview with The Herald Sun, Australian newspaper, MJ, the Charlotte Bobcats owner, spoke extensively about the need for revenue sharing and mentioned Milwaukee Bucks’ Australian center Andrew Bogut. That violated the league’s policy that bars team owners and employees from discussing the lockout or any players during the work stoppage. The NBA sent out a league-wide memo just before the lockout began on July 1 stating that anyone who broke the rules could be fined up to $1 million. – espn

Jordan, who along with Bucks owner Herb Kohl recently lobbied other owners to support revenue sharing, told The Herald Sun: “We need a lot of financial support throughout the league as well as revenue sharing to keep this business afloat.

“We have stars like Bogut who are entitled to certain type of demands. But for us to be profitable in small markets, we have to be able to win ballgames and build a better basketball team.” – espn


Sports: Football Season Is Back!!!


Giants lose season opener but jets bring home a win.
On the 10th year anniversary of September 11th the New York Giants fall short to the Washington Redskins by a score of 28-14. Jets however, walk away with a win at home against the Dallas Cowboys, barely edging them by 3 points in a 27-24 victory.


Sports: Giants Lose To Jets In Preseason Game.

BY EBENEZER SAMUEL

The Giants lost their annual preseason showdown to the Jets on Monday night, falling, 17-3, and conceding the inaugural Snoopy trophy to Gang Green.

But it wasn’t all bad for Big Blue. On the bright side, Terrell Thomas’ replacement, former first-round corner Aaron Ross, showed he still has cover skills.

Ross helped hold his old teammate, Plaxico Burress, without a catch. Burress was targeted on four throws, and Ross was the cover man on him for most of the evening. On two occasions, he was draped all over Burress, and for the most part, he was in good position against the 6-5 target all night.

You have to figure this gave Ross a world of confidence; after two straight injury-plagued seasons, he seems to have found his groove in the last two preseason games. But he did his best not to take credit for the showing afterwards, stroking Burress and lauding his defensive coordinator, Perry Fewell.

“He didn’t get too many balls thrown his way this time,” Ross said of Burress, “but I am pretty sure that as the season goes on, him and (Mark) Sanchez will get on the same page and start to make plays together. … I know he still has it in him, he showed it in his first preseason game. Like I said, our coaches did a great job in calling the right defense for us to keep the ball out of his hands.”

One note though: Ross has done his best work the last two preseason games against big targets in Bears wideout Roy Williams and now Burress. He has yet to lock down a shiftier target, so that’s something to watch for on Thursday against the Patriots’ corps of Smurfy receivers. Then again, Ross could easily wind up covering Chad Ochocinco.

***

Safety Antrel Rolle also made his debut as the slot cornerback in nickel packages, and he held up well. He was locked onto Jets star Santonio Holmes a handful of times and played solidly. Rolle isn’t the fastest cover man in the world, but he did his best to compensate for that by being physical.

“I tried to put my hands in there as much as I can,” he said. “With the receiver, if you disrupt the route, it throws off the timing. I think that’s definitely my strength when you’re talking about press-man coverage.”

When Rolle was on the slot, the Giants had Kenny Phillips and Deon Grant at safety. Yes, that means the three-safety look is back for a second year.

***

Giants rookie Jerrel Jernigan had a rough night, muffing three punts and fumbling, and it could wind up costing him the punt return job.

The Giants have a more experienced return man in Domenik Hixon, but Hixon is coming off ACL surgery, so coach Tom Coughlin has been slow to reinstall him as return man. Hixon is still only practicing every other day, and the Giants are still trying to guard his rebuilt knee.

But Coughlin acknowledged yesterday that the team may have to make an adjustment.

“We try to do the best we can in the preseason to stay away from (Hixon returning punts) because of the obvious,” Coughlin said. “But obviously, we’re going to have to rethink that a little bit.”

Jernigan took responsibility for the miscues. He lost one of the punts in the lights, he said, but the other two errors were his fault, and he knows he may lose the job.

“I’m always concerned back there,” he said. “It’s the NFL. Coaches gotta do what they gotta do.”

***

Justin Tuck suffered what Giants officials termed a “burner” in the third quarter and left the game. A burner is essentially a stinger, so the injury was hardly serious. Tuck did not return, but after the game, he said he was “good to go,” so that injury doesn’t seem to be serious.

“Ronnie Barnes didn’t want me to break another fingernail, so he pulled me out,” Tuck joked after the game.

Mathias Kiwanuka’s latest injury could be a different story, though. Kiwanuka left the game with a groin injury and did not return, and afterwards, Coughlin sounded unsure of how the versatile linebacker was dong.

“I don’t know,” he said. “He’s got a groin, so we’ll have to see.” Giants lost their annual preseason showdown to the Jets on Monday night, falling, 17-3, and conceding the inaugural Snoopy trophy to Gang Green.

But it wasn’t all bad for Big Blue. On the bright side, Terrell Thomas’ replacement, former first-round corner Aaron Ross, showed he still has cover skills.

Ross helped hold his old teammate, Plaxico Burress, without a catch. Burress was targeted on four throws, and Ross was the cover man on him for most of the evening. On two occasions, he was draped all over Burress, and for the most part, he was in good position against the 6-5 target all night.

You have to figure this gave Ross a world of confidence; after two straight injury-plagued seasons, he seems to have found his groove in the last two preseason games. But he did his best not to take credit for the showing afterwards, stroking Burress and lauding his defensive coordinator, Perry Fewell.

“He didn’t get too many balls thrown his way this time,” Ross said of Burress, “but I am pretty sure that as the season goes on, him and (Mark) Sanchez will get on the same page and start to make plays together. … I know he still has it in him, he showed it in his first preseason game. Like I said, our coaches did a great job in calling the right defense for us to keep the ball out of his hands.”

One note though: Ross has done his best work the last two preseason games against big targets in Bears wideout Roy Williams and now Burress. He has yet to lock down a shiftier target, so that’s something to watch for on Thursday against the Patriots’ corps of Smurfy receivers. Then again, Ross could easily wind up covering Chad Ochocinco.

***

Safety Antrel Rolle also made his debut as the slot cornerback in nickel packages, and he held up well. He was locked onto Jets star Santonio Holmes a handful of times and played solidly. Rolle isn’t the fastest cover man in the world, but he did his best to compensate for that by being physical.

“I tried to put my hands in there as much as I can,” he said. “With the receiver, if you disrupt the route, it throws off the timing. I think that’s definitely my strength when you’re talking about press-man coverage.”

When Rolle was on the slot, the Giants had Kenny Phillips and Deon Grant at safety. Yes, that means the three-safety look is back for a second year.

***

Giants rookie Jerrel Jernigan had a rough night, muffing three punts and fumbling, and it could wind up costing him the punt return job.

The Giants have a more experienced return man in Domenik Hixon, but Hixon is coming off ACL surgery, so coach Tom Coughlin has been slow to reinstall him as return man. Hixon is still only practicing every other day, and the Giants are still trying to guard his rebuilt knee.

But Coughlin acknowledged yesterday that the team may have to make an adjustment.

“We try to do the best we can in the preseason to stay away from (Hixon returning punts) because of the obvious,” Coughlin said. “But obviously, we’re going to have to rethink that a little bit.”

Jernigan took responsibility for the miscues. He lost one of the punts in the lights, he said, but the other two errors were his fault, and he knows he may lose the job.

“I’m always concerned back there,” he said. “It’s the NFL. Coaches gotta do what they gotta do.”

***

Justin Tuck suffered what Giants officials termed a “burner” in the third quarter and left the game. A burner is essentially a stinger, so the injury was hardly serious. Tuck did not return, but after the game, he said he was “good to go,” so that injury doesn’t seem to be serious.

“Ronnie Barnes didn’t want me to break another fingernail, so he pulled me out,” Tuck joked after the game.

Mathias Kiwanuka’s latest injury could be a different story, though. Kiwanuka left the game with a groin injury and did not return, and afterwards, Coughlin sounded unsure of how the versatile linebacker was dong.

“I don’t know,” he said. “He’s got a groin, so we’ll have to see.”


Sports: Yankees Hit 3 Grand Slams In One game!!!

The New York Yankees, no strangers to making history, accomplished another major league first on Thursday by hitting three grand slams in one game.

Russell Martin, Robinson Cano and Curtis Granderson each hit bases-loaded longballs in turning what was once a comfortable Oakland Athletics lead into a Yankees rout.

The A’s at one point led Thursday’s game 7-1, but Granderson’s eighth-inning blast off A’s reliever Bruce Billings gave the Yankees a 21-8 lead and their historic third slam.

For the heck of it, Andruw Jones followed with a tape-measure shot off Brian Fuentes for a 22-8 Yankees lead. The Yankees held on to win 22-9.

No major league club had ever hit more than two in one game, and even the Yankees had never hit two grand slams at Yankee Stadium (any of them) before Cano and Martin unloaded with slams off Rich Harden (in the fifth) and Fautino De Los Santos (in the sixth), respectively.

The late-game carnage: New York batted around in each of the final four innings, tallying four runs in the fifth and sixth and six each in the seventh and eighth.

The Yankees became the first club since the Phillies in 2009 to score 22 runs in one game. And it was the most runs the A’s had yielded since 1955.

A’s pitchers may never live this down: They gave up 21 hits. All 22 runs were earned. And perhaps most egregiously, Oakland pitchers issued 13 walks.

Relievers Billings (four walks, six hits, seven runs in 1 1/3 innings) and Jordan Norberto (one hit, five walks, four runs allowed while recording just two outs) were the biggest offenders.

Little wonder, then, that the Yankees coaxed three balls over the fence with three men on.

“You gotta be pretty fortunate to do that. You’ve got to get the bases loaded, a lot,” manager Joe Girardi said. “We got production from everywhere in our lineup.”

Martin had the day of days, going 5-for-5 with six RBI and two home runs, the second a mere solo shot in the fourth.

Girardi subbed out his starters liberally, to the point that his second baseman for the bottom of the ninth was catcher/DH Jorge Posada.

The final out of the game came when Posada fielded a grounder from A’s rookie Anthony Recker and, from about 30 feet, gunned a throw to first base that Nick Swisher dug out deftly.

It seemed a perfectly absurd conclusion to a crazy day in the Bronx.
~ USA Today


SPORTS: Amir Khan Wins, Zab Judah Falls With A Uppercut To His Stomach.


Brooklyn Bred fighter Zab Judah Falls in the 5th with a shot to the stomach. Some fans Argued it was a low blow but Amir Khan was just the bigger better fighter in this match. Zabs age seemed to show just a little, and Amir Khan clearly was in control of the fight. Sad day for us Brooklynites Check the highlights below.


SPORTS: Dallas Mavericks And Dirk Win Big At Espy’s

Professional basketball’s Dallas Mavericks and their star player Dirk Nowitzki took home top Espy Awards on Wednesday night, capping a year that saw them become improbable champions.

The Mavericks, who won the National Basketball Association championship over a Miami Heat team filled with superstars including LeBron James and Dwayne Wade, won the Espy for best team and Nowitzki was named best male athlete.

“If this Dallas Mavericks team proved anything, it’s that good guys do win and can win and will win,” said team owner Mark Cuban on stage accepting the team honor.

The win was somewhat awkward, however, because the NBA and its players are currently embroiled in a bitter contract dispute that has caused team owners to lock out players, and the two opposing groups are not talking to each other.

German-born Nowitzki, accepting his award for best male athlete, acknowledged the uncomfortable scene at the awards saying he would like to thank Cuban, but couldn’t “since I can’t talk to him.”

Olympic and World Cup champion skier Lindsey Vonn picked up the trophy for best female athlete for the second straight year. Like others, she thanked numerous people, but then Vonn looked at pop star Justin Bieber in the audience and asked “will you take a picture with me for my Facebook page.”

Bieber laughed and nodded yes.

The Espys are given to athletes by all sports cable TV network ESPN, and annually are a top gathering for men and women in fields from professional football to skiing, auto racing and even lesser-watched games such as lacrosse. Winners are chosen by fan voting.

Other awards included best breakthrough athlete, which went to pro basketball player Blake Griffin of the Los Angeles Clippers and best championship performance for Tim Thomas, the goalie for pro hockey’s Stanley Cup winner, the Boston Bruins. Thomas also was named best National Hockey League player.

U.S. women’s soccer team player Abby Wambach was given an award for best play with her recent goal in the women’s World Cup. Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers was named best National Football League Player, and Nascar racing champion took home the Espy for best driver.

Host Seth Meyers got the show off to a comic start, poking fun at athletes ranging from football’s Brett Favre to baseball pitcher Brian Wilson and his much talked-about, bushy black beard. “Some pitchers have goatees; Brian Wilson has a goat,” joked Meyers. source:Reuters.com


SPORTS: K-Rod Gone Who Will Be Next?

That was the obvious question for Sandy Alderson after he completed the Francisco Rodriguez trade with the Brewers during the ninth inning of Tuesday night’s All-Star Game.

Carlos Beltran? Jose Reyes? David Wright?

Alderson denied Wednesday that dealing K-Rod is the start of a fire sale for the Mets, who at 46-45 are holding on in the wild-card race by their fingernails….


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