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Glossary: NEW CATEGORY

is pleased to announce that a glossary category will be initiated beginning today. Get It Done Blog prides itself on helping the aspiring artists by providing the necessary information and knowledge needed to become educated in their chosen craft.


Industry Tips & Advice: How to start a career in radio and get music on the radio

LWO Magazine presents 102 JAMZ radio personality Shelly Flash. Take a look at this interview if you want a career in radio or want to know how to get you music on-air.


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Sell 200,000 CDs Without a Record Company – Ty Cohen

Learn How to Market, Promote & Sell Your Music Worldwide Using Nothing More Then MySpace!


Industry Tips & Advice: MUSIC PUBLISHING – AN INTRODUCTION (Part 2 of 2) by Alan Korn

This article is part 2 of an overview on music publishing. In the last article I discussed what music publishers do and the types of income they collect. This column looks at typical publishing deals that are available.

SHOULD I ENTER INTO A PUBLISHING DEAL?
Actually, not every artist needs to enter a publishing deal. It may be wiser to first obtain a major record deal before finding a music publisher. Conversely, publishers may want nothing to do with an artist who doesn’t have a record deal or some other guaranteed way to generate income. In addition, some artists may prefer to hold onto their copyrights and let administration agencies collect their publishing income.

HOW IS SONGWRITING INCOME SPLIT WITH A PUBLISHER?

With the exception of print music, income from musical compositions is generally split on a 50/50 basis between the music publisher and writer. The publisher’s half of this income is called the “publisher’s share,” and the writer’s half is the “writer’s share.”

To illustrate how this works in the real world, let’s take the following example. Imagine a publisher collects slightly more than $.68 (68 cents) in mechanical royalties from the sale of one of your CDs (actually 10 songs x $.091 cents per song x 75% rate for controlled compositions = 68.25 cents. I’ll round off the extra ¼ cent for purposes of this article). Assuming there are no collection costs deducted off the top, the publisher’s share comes to approximately $.34 (34 cents) and the writer’s share also comes to approximately $.34 (34 cents).

This financial split is a basic, but important, concept. When discussing publishing income, be sure to remember this distinction between “publisher’s share” and “writer’s share.”

WHAT TYPES OF MUSIC PUBLISHING DEALS ARE AVAILABLE?
STANDARD PUBLISHING AGREEMENTS

Standard music publishing deals come in several varieties. These include song-by-song publishing deals for specific compositions, and exclusive songwriter agreements that may last for a fixed period of years (usually 1 year with options to extend the term). These publishing deals may cover all songs written by an artist, or just those songs commercially released during the term of the agreement.

Under either arrangement, the publisher becomes the copyright owner of the songs. In exchange, the Publisher may pay the artist an advance based upon the potential value of the compositions. Subsequent income generated from these songs is then split, usually on a 50/50 basis. After the publisher recovers its advance, the artist is paid the “writer’s share” of net income received, while the publisher retains its publisher’s share.

CO-PUBLISHING AGREEMENTS

Co-publishing deals are similar to the above arrangement, except the artist (or the artist’s publishing entity) co-owns a percentage of the copyright along with the publisher. It is common for both parties to each own 50% of the copyright, though percentages can vary from deal to deal.

In a CO-publishing deal, the songwriter’s publishing entity also receives a percentage of the “publisher’s share” of income. Thus, using the above hypothetical, an artist would receive the “writer’s share” of the publishing “pie” (i.e., 34 cents), while also receiving up to half the net income from the publisher’s share of the publishing “pie”(i.e., an additional 17 cents).

Although CO-publishing deals are sometimes better than standard publishing deals, not all CO-publishing deals are in the artists best interest. For instance, some independent record labels require new artists to enter into a CO-publishing deal with the label’s “publishing” entity. (Ironically, few major labels require this of their artists). Even if you are offered an additional advance for such a deal, you should resist it! Here’s why:

The record company’s goal here is to reduce the amount of money payable to you from record sales (since the record company gets to keep 50% of the “publisher’s share” of mechanical royalty income);
Independent record labels may lack the experience and resources to promote your songs like an independent publishing company;
An independent publisher has more incentive to demand and accounting and collect publishing income from your label; and
It may actually be in your interest to retain these copyrights and enter into an administration deal instead.
ADMINISTRATION AGREEMENTS

In an administration deal, the publishing administrator collects income and also helps promote the songwriter’s catalogue. An administration deal may last for a specific period of time (i.e., 3 years) or for one year with several options to renew. When the term is over, all rights revert back to the artist.

A publishing administrator is typically paid by deducting a percentage of the income it collects on behalf of the artist. After deducting this administration fee (anywhere from 10% to 20% of the gross proceeds) the administrator distributes 100% of the remaining net income to the songwriter(s). As an incentive to promote your songs, some administrators may also charge a slightly higher collection fee for income earned from cover songs.

In some cases, a songwriter may receive as much income from a co-publisher as a publishing administrator. However, while a CO-publisher may be able to offer a generous advance, an administration deal can provide an artist with greater financial and artistic control. There are also many advantages to retaining the copyright to your songs. For example, if your first record sells only moderately but your next CD becomes commercially successful, you may gain greater leverage to negotiate a favorable publishing, CO-publishing or administration deal at a later date.

FURTHER READING:
These two columns provide just a brief overview of the music publishing industry. Because publishing money is often a major source of revenue for recording artists, it is important to know about your publishing rights. For those who want to learn more about this area, one book worth reading is “Music, Money and Success: The Insider’s Guide to the Music Industry” by Jeff Brabec and Todd Brabec. The authors have years of experience in the music business, and their book provides a detailed guide to publishing industry practices, including tips on what to look for in a publishing deal.

Alan Korn
Law Office of Alan Korn
1840 Woolsey Street
Berkeley, CA 94703
Ph: (510) 548-7300
Fax: (510) 540-4821
aakorn@igc.org
www.alankorn.com

SOURCE:

http://www.alankorn.com/articles/publishing_2.html


Industry Tips & Advice: MUSIC PUBLISHING – AN OVERVIEW (Part 1 of 2) by Alan Korn

This article is designed to give an overview of music publishing. Although the details can be less than fascinating, music publishing remains one of the most financially lucrative areas in the music business, and one of the few areas where artists can generate real money. As a result, it is particularly crucial for recording artists and songwriters to protect their publishing rights. The best way to start is to learn the basics of the music publishing business.

WHAT IS A MUSIC PUBLISHER?
Before the invention of the phonograph, songwriters earned income by relying on music publishers to sell sheet music of their songs. Even as radio and television replaced the piano in the parlor, music publishers continued to play an important role as popular singers continued to rely upon established songwriters to provide their material. However, with the advent of rock and roll (and especially the Beatles) popular recording artists began to write more of their own songs. Since that time, the music publishing industry has taken on a less important role. Nevertheless, music publishers continue to perform several important functions that you should be aware of.

WHAT DOES A MUSIC PUBLISHER DO?
Today, music publishers are concerned with administering copyrights, licensing songs to record companies and others, and collecting royalties on behalf of the songwriter. Some of the more important music publishing activities are listed below:
Mechanical Royalties

The term “mechanical royalties” initially referred to royalties paid whenever a song was reproduced by a mechanical device (remember that one of a copyright owner’s exclusive rights is the right to authorize the reproduction of their work). The term “mechanical royalties” was applied to the reproduction of songs in music boxes, player pianos rolls, and later, phonograph records. This term is still used, and “mechanical royalties” now refers to royalties paid for the reproduction of songs on CD, DAT, audiocassette, flexi-discs, musical greeting cards, and other devices sold on a “per unit” basis.

The amount of money a record company must pay for a mechanical license is generally set by the Copyright Royalty Tribunal. This rate is sometimes referred to as a “statutory” rate. The current statutory rate through December 31, 2007 is nine and one-tenth cent ($.091) per song. This means that a single song can generate up to $.91 cents for every 10 records sold. Unfortunately, it is record industry custom to pay only 75% of the statutory rate to new or moderately successful songwriters. This means that a typical songwriter without enormous clout would generate a little more than 68 cents for every 10 records sold. After the publisher collects this money from the record company and takes its share of the income, a songwriter may receive as little as half of this amount.
Foreign Monies

Foreign countries sometimes have different laws governing the collection and distribution of mechanical royalties. As a result, it is often necessary for publishers to enter into agreements with a foreign publisher (or “subpublishers”) to collect a songwriter’s mechanical royalties in that territory. After the subpublisher takes a cut (anywhere from 15% to 25%) the rest of this foreign income is divided between the publisher and the songwriter according to their agreement.

Synchronization Licenses
Whenever a song is used with a visual image, it is necessary to obtain a “synchronization” (or “synch”) license permitting the use of that song. Music publishers issue synch licenses to television advertisers, motion picture companies, video manufacturers and CD-Rom companies. A portion of this money (usually 1/2 the net proceeds) is paid to the songwriter.

Transcription Licenses
Because radio is not a visual medium, the use of a song as part of a radio commercial requires a separate license, known as a “transcription license.” Sometimes songwriters are able to negotiate provisions in their publishing contract preventing their songs from use in certain contexts, such as ads for alcohol, tobacco, political campaigns or other uses the songwriter may find offensive.

Print Licenses
Although sheet music sales have diminished over the years, many songs are still available in print form. These include books of songs by specific artists, instruction books or compilations of hits within a given genre (i.e., “100 Country Hits of All Time”). The music publisher issues print licenses and collects this income from the sheet music company, while the songwriter receives a small royalty derived from the sale of his or her song in print form.

Administration and Registration of Copyrights
Because music publishers generate money by licensing copyrighted compositions, they must also perform various administrative tasks involving copyright transfers and the registration of musical copyrights with the U.S. Copyright Office. Registering your copyright with the US Copyright Office provides added protection to copyright holders, and can permit the copyright owner to recover statutory damages of up to $100,000 and attorneys fees if the copyright is subsequently infringed.

Public Performance Royalties
A copyright owner also has the exclusive right to authorize the “public performance” of that work. This is why radio and television broadcasters must enter into licenses with performance rights organizations such as BMI, ASCAP and SESAC. These performance rights organizations collect income on behalf of songwriters and music publishers whenever a song is publicly broadcast. A future column of the Fine Print will discuss these performance rights organizations in more detail.

Even though music publishers do not collect this performance rights income, publishers remain entitled to 50% of the money received by BMI, ASCAP, SESAC and others. Publishers also register songs with these performance rights organizations.

“Song Plugging”
This obscure term refers to music bizzers who promote the compositions of others. This may involve convincing popular artists to cover your song, or convincing Disney to use your latest tune in their next animated feature.

Translations
Publishers may also authorize translations in order to generate income from cover versions of a particular song in foreign countries.

Obtaining a Record Deal
Music publishers are usually generally most in signing established songwriters or recording artists who write their own material. However, some publishers may be willing to sign new songwriters or bands without a record deal. If a publisher believes an undiscovered artist will one day sell lots of hit records, they may help the artist record demos and assist in trying to land a major record deal. If the artist gets signed, the music publisher will hope to see a reward for its investment in the form of mechanical royalties, public performance royalties and other derivative income. A publisher may even be willing to contribute to tour support or provide extra promotions money in order to generate future publishing income from record sales and airplay.

WHY CONSIDER A PUBLISHING DEAL?
The main reason is money. Music publishers may be willing to pay a substantial cash advance for a songwriter’s past, present or future material. In exchange, the publisher will own a percentage of that artist’s musical copyrights and keep a percentage of money these songs earn.

Of course, publishers are unlikely to pay an advance unless they believe they can make a profit on the deal. Like everyone else in the industry, music publishers are in the business of buying something of yours in order to sell it to others at a profit. Unfortunately, many artists do not realize how valuable their publishing rights are. The history of the music business is littered with sleazy promoters who paid pennies for songs that later generated millions in income.

Not every artist needs a publishing deal, and some artists may be better off by avoiding traditional publishing deal altogether. Many different publishing options may be available to an artist today. Some publishers may be willing to enter into a more limited “co-publishing” deal, and “administration” deals may be available for independent artists who seek to retain their valuable copyrights. The next column will look at each of these deals more closely.

SOURCE:

http://www.alankorn.com/articles/publishing_1.html


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Dj – Danny Rampling Shoom Interview

Everything You Need to Know about DJ’ing and Success

Life is about relationships, people, happiness, health, career and so much more. You deserve the very best and to live a charmed life. I’ve included tips and secrets to keep you at the top of your game, whatever game you are in. The insider secrets I share with you about the music industry and DJing sections precede what I deem to be the most important section, all about true lasting success, fulfillment and happiness.

Do you want to learn the secrets why some people are successful and others aren’t? Ask yourself. How successful do you want to be? You just need to decide on what level you want to play at! As a future public personality, it’ s vital that you are prepared and ready for the success that will come to you. Would you like to know all of the best secrets of success that I’ve learned over a lifetime?

Your Blueprint For Success There is so much more to life than decks. Honest! http://dj-world-guide.mariakaran.com/ Everything You Need to Know about DJ’ing and Success

Fastrack Your Success

Learn About the Electronic Music Business

Learn How to Market Yourself
* How to Approach Nightclubs & Promoters to Get a Gig
* Ingenious Ways to Increase your Fan Base
* How to prepare the perfect demo for promoters and club owners
* Which DJ agencies to contact
* How to break into the radio broadcasting
* What it takes to be a great resident DJ
* The essential skills to be a great mobile DJ
* How to promote yourself using different mediums
* How to develop a strong, professional image and identity
* Advice on Finding Professional Photography & Design (& other skill sets), Cheaply!

Everything You Need To Know About DJing &; Success also contains an extensive bonus section, full of industry contacts and resources,
which in itself has taken me YEARS and YEARS (and thousands of pounds) to collate. This alone is worth thousands of pounds.

http://dj-world-guide.mariakaran.com/

Everything You Need to Know about DJ’ing and Success


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Become a DJ at a Club – Important First Lessons by John Newcomb

DJing is a difficult industry to break into. You may know all the technical aspects of DJing and may even be able to teach others how to become a DJ, but success may still elude you because of the tough competition.

The first thing you need to know is that unless you are phenomenally talented, it will take a long time to get a well paying gig at a good club. You will initially have to begin by freelancing. Freelance DJs are at the very bottom of the DJ industry and do face certain scorn from professionals. The irony is that even the professionals started out as freelancers.

Freelance DJs can usually be found playing at weddings, birthday parties, and small, local events such as school dances. I know this sounds like DJ hell, but this is a very important stage for a DJ – it teaches you how to play music for a very diverse crowd. More importantly, small gigs like these help you pick up the nuances of DJing – charisma, gauging the mood of the crowd, etc. while still getting some all important practice.

These gigs are also good for networking. As any professional DJ will tell you, DJing is a lot about knowing the right people. Try to get to know people whereever you are playing, even if its a wedding. Who knows you may just catch the eye of the right person and land yourself a good gig at a club.

The night club scene is, of course, where all the action is. Before you graduate to this level, you would have hopefully played in smaller gigs several times and have a firm grip on the technical as well as non-technical aspects of DJing. Night club gigs are often make-or-break opportunities (unless you happen to know the owner of the club, of course), and all your experience will come handy at moments like these.

The most important thing for a good DJ is to have a style that is unique to him. This can only be created through extensive practice. At the night club level, having your own unique sound will help set you apart from the others and hopefully open up doors for even more lucrative gigs.

Moral of the story: as a DJ, you should never shirk from any sort of gig, no matter how small it may be. The best DJs started out playing at weddings and school dances. These are valuable practice grounds and you should take up these opportunities whenever you get them.

SOURCE:

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Become-a-DJ-at-a-Club—Important-First-Lessons&id=5644762


Industry Tips & Advice: The Differences Between Songwriting in NYC & Nashville by Cliff Goldmacher


As a transplanted songwriter from Nashville to New York City, I’ve had the chance to observe, up close, the approaches to songwriting and the songwriting communities in both cities. While there are of course many similarities, there are also quite a few differences. By the way, I feel I should mention that the following observations are really more my impressions than hard facts.

Differences Within the Similarities

In this article, I’ll start with a similarity between New York and Nashville as it’s readily apparent and then explain how, within that similarity, one city differs from the other. One of the first similarities is that both cities have huge songwriting populations. The depth and breadth of talent in both places encompass many more genres that the obvious country music for Nashville and pop and rock music for New York. There are great pop writers in the suburbs of Nashville and extremely accomplished country songwriters living in Greenwich Village.

Finding the Songwriters

One difference between the two songwriting communities is how easy they are to locate. Because Nashville’s artistic community is predominantly made up of singers, songwriters and musicians, it’s much easier to find the music/songwriting community there. New York, on the other hand, has a wonderful songwriter population, but it’s mixed in with the countless other artists and creative types that live there and is thus less obvious. In other words, it takes a little more effort to find the songwriters in New York, but believe me, they’re there.

Before moving from Nashville to New York, I’d taken several writing trips a year up to New York and, by a process or trial and error, I found a core group of NYC songwriters that became my go to people on every trip. This way, when I eventually moved to New York, I felt like I was instantly part of the community even though I had to discover it little by little. I highly recommend this approach for anyone considering a move to New York as it eases the transition and makes the entire process much less overwhelming.

Co-writing

Although both New York and Nashville have large numbers of songwriters, co-writing is much more a part of the day to day routine in Nashville. It’s not unusual for a Nashville writer to have five co-writing appointments in a week where they meet with a different cowriter every day in a publishing company office on Music Row. This happens for several reasons. First of all, as a hired staff songwriter for a Nashville publishing company, you are given a yearly quota of songs that you need to fulfill. The more songs you write, the more quickly you’ll fulfill your quota. Publishers make a real effort to connect songwriters they think will work well together and go as far as to set up co-writing appointments for their writers. As a result, it’s fairly common in Nashville to be set up on a “blind date” cowrite. Secondly, even though you’re only credited with half a song for a cowrite, it’s easier to motivate yourself to write if you’ve got someone to collaborate with. The act of scheduling appointments and being expected to show up significantly eases the stress of having to create on a schedule. This approach seems odd to a lot of New York writers who are either artists themselves and used to writing with their own bands or are songwriters used to working with artists whose schedules are much less predictable.

Lyrics

Staying with the generality that you’re writing country in Nashville and pop or rock in New York, I’ve noticed that the rules of lyric-writing between these genres and cities differ significantly. In Nashville, the story is king. This means that the lyric has to make perfect sense, the images are concrete and the story has a logical flow from beginning to end. There’s not a lot of room for poetic, impressionistic lyrics that don’t have the arc of a story. New York, on the other hand, while it certainly has its share of great songwriter/storytellers, has a broader tolerance in its pop and rock genres for words that “feel” and “sound” good together. Please don’t misunderstand. It takes just as much skill to write a great pop lyric where the words convey the emotion of the song and carry the nuances of the melody as it does to write a great story in a country song, but it’s a different skill set. I’ve found that switching from one approach to the other can be creatively liberating and quite a bit of fun. Also, it’s interesting to see how one city’s lyrical approach can bleed into the other’s. In this way, you can end up with country lyrics where the words in the story sound good next to each other or pop lyrics with the arc of a story to them.

Labels

Speaking of artists, another similarity in the two cities is that they are both home to major record labels and their signed artists. This alone attracts a huge number of songwriters to both cities. The difference here is that country music artists are still largely dependent upon outside songs for their projects. In New York, bands tend to write their own material and it is less common for these artists to go looking for outside songs. Occasionally songwriters will be paired with these bands/artists in New York allowing the writers to end up with cuts on these acts. Of course, all of these distinctions are lessening as more country artists write and cowrite their albums as well.

You Can’t Lose

At the end of the day, both communities are great places to work and create. Ironically, after living in Nashville, working as a staff songwriter and writing for the country market for twelve years, my first cut was with a New York writer and was recorded by an Irish tenor on Universal Records named Ronan Tynan. In my opinion, it was the blend of our New York and Nashville songwriting sensibilities that came together to create that song. What I mean by this is that somewhere between the soaring melody more suited to pop and the lyric that had more of a country attention to detail, we came up with a classical crossover song. So, if you’re a Nashville writer thinking about working in New York (or vice versa) I’d highly recommend it. Sometimes it’s the differences that create the best art.

SOURCE:

http://www.songwriting.net/blog/bid/57769/The-Differences-Between-Songwriting-in-NYC-Nashville


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