ENTERTAINMENT NEWS AND CAREER ADVICE

Posts tagged “Industry\

Industry Tips & Advice: Music Industry 101

Sit down with Mr. Anthony Hubbard, music industry vet, who has managed, and worked multi-platinum artists and producers over the past 10 years.


Industry Tips & Advice: Record Label Contacts (2008)


Industry Tips & Advice: Just Blaze gives advice to upcoming artists

Just blaze gives advice to upcoming artists at New Music Seminar in NYC 2010.

New Music Seminar 2010 NYC Webster Hall


Industry Tips & Advice: Self Promote Your Music by Heather McDonald

Unless you have major label money behind you, the ability to self promote your music is one of the most important skills you can have. When you don’t have money to hire PR people to run media campaigns for you, it is up to you to make sure people know about the music you are making. Getting started can be a little overwhelming, however. These steps will help you start out on the right foot, to make sure all of the right people are standing up and taking notice of you.

Time Required: Ongoing
Here’s How:

1.Identify Your Goals – When you set out to promote your music, don’t try to cover too much ground at once. Look at the way larger artists are promoted – they have specific campaigns that promote specific things, like a new album or a tour. Choose one thing to promote, like:

•A single
•A show
•A website

Once you know what to promote, you will be able to make clear goals for yourself, i.e. if you want to promote your website, then your goal is to bring traffic to the site. With these goals in mind, you’ll find it easier to come up with promotion ideas, and you’ll be better able to judge the success of your promotions.

2.Target the Right Audience – With your promotional goal in mind, figure out who the right audience for your campaign is. If you have a gig coming up, then the right audience for your promotion are the local print publications and radio stations in the town in which your show is happening. If you have a limited edition single coming out, your primary audience is your band mailing list, plus the media. Going for the right audience is especially important if you’re on a budget. Don’t waste time and money letting town X knowing about an upcoming show in town Y or a folk magazine about your new hip hop album.

3.Have a Promo Package – Just like when you send a demo to a label , to self promote your music, you need a good promo package. Your package should have:

•A press release detailing your news
•A short (one page) band bio
•A CD (a demo recording is ok, or an advance copy of an upcoming release)
•A package of any press coverage you have had so far – press coverage begets press coverage
•Your contact information (make sure to include an email address – people may hesitate to call you)
•A color photo, or a link to a site where a photo can be downloaded. The press is more likely to run a photo if they don’t have to chase it.

4.Find Your Niche – The sad truth is, every writer, radio station, website, or fan for that matter, you are trying to reach is likely being bombarded with info from other music hopefuls. You a reason to stand out. Try to find something that will make people more curious about you – give them a reason to want to know more. Being elusive worked wonders for Belle & Sebastian at the start of their career and people write about Marilyn Manson for being, well, Marilyn Manson. You don’t have to devise a huge, calculated persona, but giving people a reason to check out your show or your CD before the others can only help.

5.Bribe ‘Em – Another way to stand out from the crowd is plain old free stuff. Even press people and label bosses love getting something for nothing, and you’ll whip your fans into a frenzy (and get new fans) by giving stuff away. Some ideas:

•Put some money behind the bar at a show and give free drink passes to all the industry people who come to check you out.
•Give people on your mailing list an exclusive download once a month (be it a new song or an alternate version of a song)
•At gigs, raffle (for free) mix CDs made by the band – everyone who signs up to your mailing list at the show gets entered in the drawing.

6.Branding – Get your name out there. Make up some stickers, badges, posters, lighters or anything else you can think of that include your band’s name. Then, leave the stuff anywhere you can. Pass them out at your favorite clubs, leave them on the record shop counter, poster the light posts – go for it. Soon, your name will be familiar to people even if they don’t know why, and when they see your name in the paper advertising an upcoming show, they’ll think “hey…I know that name, I wonder what that’s all about..”

7.Keep Track of Your Contacts – As you go through all of these steps, chances are that you are going to pick up a lot of new contacts along the way. Some of these contacts will be industry people and some will be fans. Never lose track of a contact. Keep a database on your computer for the industry people you have met and another database of fan contacts. These databases should be your first port of call for your next promotional campaign – and these databases should always be growing. Don’t write anyone off, even if you don’t get much feedback from them. You never know who is going to give you the break you need.

Tips:
1.Know When to Act Small – This step ties in with targeting the right audience and identifying your goals – you can save a lot of time spinning your wheels by keeping the small stuff small. While it’s always useful to keep other people up to date with what’s happening in your career, that guy from Rolling Stone doesn’t really need to know every time your band is playing a half hour set at the local club, especially if the local press really hasn’t given you much coverage yet. When you’re getting started, the easiest place to start a buzz is your local area. Build up the small stuff to get to the bigger stuff.

2.But Know When to Act Large – Sometimes, a larger campaign really is in order. Go full speed ahead when you have something big brewing, like:

•A new album
•A tour
•An important piece of news, like an award or a new record deal
This kind of news warrants contacting both the media and people you want to work with, like labels, agents, managers and so on.

3.Find the RIGHT Niche – As mentioned, finding your niche is helpful in getting noticed. There is one caveat however – make sure you get noticed for the right reasons. You certainly will get some attention for bad, unprofessional behavior, but the problem is that your music won’t be what everyone is talking about – and isn’t that what you really want to be recognized for? Don’t do yourself the disservice of self promoting a bad rep for yourself. Make sure you get noticed for your talent instead.

Also, don’t be fake. If you’re not sure what your niche is yet, don’t push it. Stay true to yourself and your music.

4.Grow your Database – In addition to keeping tracks of the contacts you have, don’t be afraid to help your database grow by adding some “dream” contacts to your list. Is there an agent you want to take notice of you? Then include them on your press release mailing list or promo mailing list when you have big news to share. Let them know you’re still working and still building your career – pretty soon, they may be knocking on your door.

5.Take a Deep Breath – For many people, the idea of self promoting their music to their fans is easy, but the idea of calling up the press is downright terrifying. Relax. Here’s the truth – some people you call will be nice, some people won’t be. Some people will never return your calls or emails. Some will. You shouldn’t take any of it personally. You definitely shouldn’t be afraid to try. Covering bands is the job of the music media – they expect to hear from you. Don’t be discouraged by someone who is rude, or someone who is polite, but still says “no”. Don’t write them off, either. Next time, you may hear “yes.”

SOURCE:

http://musicians.about.com/od/beingamusician/ht/selfpromote.htm


Industry Tips & Advice: Why Artists Should Own Their Own Publishing

Syd Butler, founder and President of French Kiss Records, tells aspiring artists why they should make sure to retain ownership and control of the publishing rights on the songs they write.


Industry Tips & Advice: How to start a career in radio and get music on the radio

LWO Magazine presents 102 JAMZ radio personality Shelly Flash. Take a look at this interview if you want a career in radio or want to know how to get you music on-air.


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Sell 200,000 CDs Without a Record Company – Ty Cohen

Learn How to Market, Promote & Sell Your Music Worldwide Using Nothing More Then MySpace!


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Create a Music Image That Sells

Creating an image is the most important tool for a recording artist today! This shows you how to develop one that sells.


Industry Tips & Advice: Barry Menes On How Do Publishing Deals Work?

Entertainment lawyer Barry Menes talks about various publishing deals and how money is made distributed from such arrangements. He also discusses how publishers use their catalogs to generate revenue, and what a good publisher ought to be doing to generate money for their client off their catalog.


Article: Rakim Says Hip-Hop Needs Some Renovation by JT LANGLEY


A return to the roots has been a topic in hip-hop ever since the 90s Mafioso crossover back when, and though it’s an up-and-down argument as to how the genre needs to reinvent itself with the past in mind, massive renovation has yet to take place in the general mainstream. Artists have talked here and there, and some have listened, but Rakim, the emcee who most will say is the greatest to ever touch bars, from ’87 with Eric B, to The Seventh Seal in 2009, shared some words to the public in a recent interview with The Guardian on the topic.

“It’s hard,” Rakim said. “The conscious level is definitely low and the substance of the music is so much lighter, but you have to understand the game is young in new places. It’s still growing…We really need some of that consciousness, that fly on the wall that watches over us and comments. I like B.o.B. and Lupe Fiasco a lot, they’re both exploring the music, but I don’t see a lot of artistry out there.”

I’m done talking about Odd Future in individual articles, but they’re a major player under Rakim’s words, being that they are the youngest mainstream music makers at the moment, along with [name your favorite gangster rapper of the 2000s], and your Lil Bs, Guccis, and Waka Flockas. And you can stretch it far beyond that.

Hip-hop’s holding some roots and making some major steps forward in style, but they don’t seem to be stretching back to remember The Bronx origin and tradition of the artform, so Rakim’s putting it right. If you’re going to argue against him, it better be a damn good one.

Throw up your thoughts.

SOURCE:

http://www.ology.com/music/rakim-says-hip-hop-needs-some-renovation


Article: Juvenile Reflects On The State Of Hip-Hop by STEVEN J. HOROWITZ


Juvy gives his two cents on the game and how low cash-flow has hurt the rap community.

Juvenile came up as one of the flagship artists for Cash Money Records, but the game ain’t the same for the Louisiana rapper. Juvy recently explained how money doesn’t flow like it used to, and that hip-hop artist aren’t the only ones feeling the sting.

“I wish it was making more money, man. I can’t judge cats out there who doing they thing,” he told Southern Smoke TV. “Of course, I’m a [Lil] Wayne fan first, and everybody else fall behind that. But it’s a whole lot of rap that’s not good rap out there. Probably better music than my era but they not getting paid for it. I wish there was another way we could get some revenue in. The show money ain’t even like it was because street niggas ain’t eating like they used to eat.”

He continued by explaining the trickledown effect that low revenue can have on club owners. “It’s ugly all the way around,” he stated. “I’ll show you where it hurts us now. Of course, a lot of those cats are the cats who spend money on booking us shows and buying music. But when all that’s sold out, it kind of hurts man, especially the club owners saying they ain’t making no money because they ain’t selling no alcohol. All of that is kind of a trickledown effect for what’s going on right now.”

The former Hot Boys member most recently signed to Rap-A-Lot to release his next album.

SOURCE:

http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/news/id.15111/title.juvenile-reflects-on-the-state-of-hip-hop/


Industry Tips & Advice: Social Media Marketing for Your Music Business by Japheth

The new digital landscape has caused an apparent tsunami in the music industry. With the rather constant barrage of reports and claims indicating that digital music downloads (both legal and illegal) are financially bringing down the industry, one might assume that digital technology is the enemy. Although a pessimistic attitude is somewhat appropriate for those businesses tied to their old-world models of manufacturing and distribution, the opposite is true for those willing to embrace digital technology and marketing for their music business. In the same way that digital music for artists has allowed for selling to more fans than previously possible with selling CDs alone, digital marketing provides opportunities and solutions to reach more potential fans than the artist could by merely connecting with people at music venues. Internet marketing, specifically social media marketing, allows an artist to target not only the local scene, but a truly international base of fans.

The New Music Ecosystem


Bas Grasmayer posted an article on Hypebot.com entitled The Ecosystem Approach: Introducing Non-Linear Music Marketing for the Digital Age. He talks about how the Internet and digital mediums have brought a new non-linear ecosystem to the world of music marketing. This means that the interaction among a group of consumers plays a larger role today in music business. The direct connections and control of the music industry now take a back-seat to the driving force of community influence.

Today, retention or keeping fans requires “stimulating the non-linear communication.” In the new ecosystem, you must facilitate consumers or fans building relationships with each other. Your product will still be the central point of the activity, but the customers interacting among themselves will propel and cause viral marketing for your product. Grasmayer explains it with a party analogy:

Treat every listener as a guest to your house party. If you don’t introduce them to others, you’ll be the center of attention all the time, but you can’t talk to everyone at the same time, so people are likely to get bored and leave. The key to a successful party is connecting the strangers, so they can have fun together. You’re still the center of the ecosystem, but you’re not the only person to communicate to. The communication becomes non-linear!

Besides the interpersonal communication among the fan base, you must also personally build a direct connection with each consumer or fan using such tools as social media networking. When you connect with fans and give them a reason to buy, you will ultimately make money. Nurture the connection by being authentic and consistent, always being able to admit when things go wrong and fixing the issues.

Finally, listen to the ecosystem. Make sure your marketing plans are fluid and evolve according to the feedback from your digital community of fans and customers. This could be called social media optimization. The key to success is giving people what they want.

Engage with Purpose

Brian Solis, globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in new media and author of the book Engage!, was recently interviewed on the subject of engaging with a purpose. He states that no matter the business or size, “every company should start with learning.” This ties back into listening to the ecosystem. One must intentionally monitor the conversations and activities of the community to know how to effectively engage that community. Solis states: “Social media didn’t invent conversations and opinions, but it allows us to have access to what people think and share—right now.”

The interviewer asked the question: “How much time should a company allocate to social media engagement?” Solis says, “The answer lies in what you see and also the position you want to take in social.” The time spent correlates to the success of the marketing. In other words, it takes a “significant commitment” to have productive efforts. Solis suggests testing with pilot programs and evaluating the outcomes as you go.

If you are like me, you’ll discover that social networks can become a black hole on your time. To avoid the time-sucking properties of social media, set goals and objectives. This is really where engaging with purpose comes into play. Know your purpose and develop a plan. By sticking to the plan and engaging your fans with a purpose, you will find yourself not only spending the right amount of time on your efforts, but find each connection supporting your overall goals.

Practical Tips

You’re probably saying, “That’s all great in theory, but what about a practical application?” Luckily I’ve been involved professionally in web development and marketing since 1996. Part of my focus over the years has been in developing artist-to-fan relationships using the Internet. Here are some practical solutions that I’ve implemented with success using social media marketing:

Website
Although probably not the main source of discovery of new fans, the website for an artist or band is the foundation for an Internet marketing strategy. At the recent SXSW Music Conference, a panel discussion was held on the topic, You’ve Built a Social Network, Now What? Here was the main theme: “The artist web site is critical to a band’s success in the world of social networking. Social networks like Facebook, Twitter, MySpace – proliferate in number, grow audiences, and some even eventually die off.”

One never knows what social media tools will exist in the future. So it is imperative that your website become the center of your marketing efforts as a familiar, stable home that fans can return to. That’s why Paul Sinclair of Atlantic Records says that an artist’s website is the first component they work on when developing a social media strategy. According to Michael Fiebach, digital marketing strategist and artist manager at Famehouse, “Bands are simply ‘renting their fans to social networks’ if they do not build their own web site.”

Myspace
I believe that Myspace is still a viable resource for music marketing. When searching for a band or artist on Google, Myspace Music profiles rank at the top of the search results. It many times is still the best place to find and stream the music of an artist or band for free. There are some teenage sub-cultures that are very active on Myspace, even more than on other networks such as Facebook. If your music is of a genre associated with one of these sects, then Myspace is potentially the perfect solution for attracting new fans.

When building your Myspace Music profile, be sure to include the names of similar bands and describe your musical style. This serves as a list of keywords that help with the discovery of your profile in search results.

When building your fan base, stay away from services that claim to add friends or fans to your list. Many of these so-called fans will actually be fake profiles or even real people who you will never be able to convert into a true fan. Start by adding a small number of fans from similar artists that realistically would appreciate your music. Connect or engage with that group to solicit feedback concerning your music, profile, and marketing efforts. This is similar to the pilot program that Brian Solis speaks of. Use the gained knowledge to decide on continuing your efforts with the same types of users or whether to look at other types of users for connecting.

Facebook
To be truly successful, a band or artist must use Facebook as a tool. Create a Facebook Page as an artist or band. Do not use a personal profile. Once your Page has acquired 25 fans, you will be able to use a custom Facebook URL. You will also want to set up a custom landing page instead the default wall for your Page. Non-fans visiting your Page will initially see the landing page you specify. I use iLike to create this landing page, but I have seen several others that use ReverbNation for theirs.

I have found that the most successful way to build a fan base on Facebook is with Facebook Ads. You can target these text-based ads at users who have indicated they like a particular artist or band that is similar to you. Because you only pay-per-click, you can gain great exposure with the impressions.

I ran a Facebook Ad campaign for a music artist Page. I spent a total of $99.96. The ad received a total of 497,804 impressions. That’s about 2% of a penny for each impression. Those impressions resulted in 321 clicks. That’s about 31 cents per click. Of those clicks, 191 people actually clicked the Like button and decided to become a “fan” of the Page. That means it cost about 52 cents to gain a new fan. If only 1 in 10 decides to become a customer and buy a digital album on iTunes at a price of $9.90, the artist would actually make a profit. This is because an artist receives roughly 70% of the iTunes revenue and the one buying customer came at a cost of roughly $5.23.

Last.fm and PureVolume
Place your focus on your website, Myspace profile, and Facebook Page. Only if you find extra time, look at the additional music networking sites of Last.fm and PureVolume. I’ve used both as part of my marketing strategy, using some of the same principles suggested for Myspace. Last.fm also has advertising campaigns called Powerplay that allow you to target Internet radio listeners with guaranteed plays of your music.

Engage with HootSuite
To make the most use of your time and effectively engage with your fan base, use a social media tool such as HootSuite. This application allows you to simultaneously post status updates across social networks such as Facebook, Myspace, and Twitter. These status updates are not the engagement, but offer opportunities for engagement. HootSuite allows for following both the public and private conversations on your social network profiles and allows for you to interact. Use this to your full advantage to quickly engage your fans across social platforms.

Later this month, we will take a look at some case studies of music businesses and artists that are successfully using social media and integrating social media into their marketing efforts. Until then, go forth learning, testing, and engaging.

SOURCE:

http://www.360digitalartist.com/social-media-marketing-music-business/


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