ENTERTAINMENT NEWS AND CAREER ADVICE

Posts tagged “Tips

Industry Tips and Advice: Promo Tips For Artist PT. 3

Promo Tip #21 Get online air play. There are a lot of indie radio webcasts, join sites and do what you have to do to get on the playlists.

Promo Tip #22 Create an interesting banner to drop in your forum signatures or other online locations. Many message boards will let you leave a link and/or banner in your signature, but donÂ’t like blatant advertising.

Promo Tip #23 Brand your name across the world and be ever mindful of the image you wish to portray whenever out in public or online. When itÂ’s in print, itÂ’s permanent.

Promo Tip #24 There is such a thing as overkill, in that it is better to describe your band/music as “we sound similar to the Beatles” rather than “we are the biggest thing since Led Zeppelin!” (or better than). So word your description accordingly.

Promo Tip #25 The music business is in the business to make money. If your career is in music, know when to be businesslike.

Promo Tip #26 Learn every area of the business you are in. Knowledge is power.

Promo Tip #27 You must network. Meet people, get out there, shake hands, listen to them as well and let them know about your music. Build those relationships.

Promo Tip #28 Be on friendly terms with other bands and artists in your area.

Promo Tip #29 Create a “street team”, online and/or offline…they are core people that wish to help you further your marketing efforts. Give away free tickets, CDs or merchandise to your street team as incentive.

Promo Tip #30 Announce every song, every CD, decent chart position, contest win, top sales on releases, announce anything and everything to stay in the publicÂ’s eye. If you canÂ’t write a decent article up for the press release, get someone that can. Write a review of every gig and get feedback from local VIPs, fans, whomever matters and include the best quotes. Is it news worthy? Write and promote it. Get the most mileage you can from your promotional tactics.


Industry Tips & Advice: Music Industry 101

Sit down with Mr. Anthony Hubbard, music industry vet, who has managed, and worked multi-platinum artists and producers over the past 10 years.


Glossary: NEW CATEGORY

is pleased to announce that a glossary category will be initiated beginning today. Get It Done Blog prides itself on helping the aspiring artists by providing the necessary information and knowledge needed to become educated in their chosen craft.


Industry Tips & Advice: Self Promote Your Music by Heather McDonald

Unless you have major label money behind you, the ability to self promote your music is one of the most important skills you can have. When you don’t have money to hire PR people to run media campaigns for you, it is up to you to make sure people know about the music you are making. Getting started can be a little overwhelming, however. These steps will help you start out on the right foot, to make sure all of the right people are standing up and taking notice of you.

Time Required: Ongoing
Here’s How:

1.Identify Your Goals – When you set out to promote your music, don’t try to cover too much ground at once. Look at the way larger artists are promoted – they have specific campaigns that promote specific things, like a new album or a tour. Choose one thing to promote, like:

•A single
•A show
•A website

Once you know what to promote, you will be able to make clear goals for yourself, i.e. if you want to promote your website, then your goal is to bring traffic to the site. With these goals in mind, you’ll find it easier to come up with promotion ideas, and you’ll be better able to judge the success of your promotions.

2.Target the Right Audience – With your promotional goal in mind, figure out who the right audience for your campaign is. If you have a gig coming up, then the right audience for your promotion are the local print publications and radio stations in the town in which your show is happening. If you have a limited edition single coming out, your primary audience is your band mailing list, plus the media. Going for the right audience is especially important if you’re on a budget. Don’t waste time and money letting town X knowing about an upcoming show in town Y or a folk magazine about your new hip hop album.

3.Have a Promo Package – Just like when you send a demo to a label , to self promote your music, you need a good promo package. Your package should have:

•A press release detailing your news
•A short (one page) band bio
•A CD (a demo recording is ok, or an advance copy of an upcoming release)
•A package of any press coverage you have had so far – press coverage begets press coverage
•Your contact information (make sure to include an email address – people may hesitate to call you)
•A color photo, or a link to a site where a photo can be downloaded. The press is more likely to run a photo if they don’t have to chase it.

4.Find Your Niche – The sad truth is, every writer, radio station, website, or fan for that matter, you are trying to reach is likely being bombarded with info from other music hopefuls. You a reason to stand out. Try to find something that will make people more curious about you – give them a reason to want to know more. Being elusive worked wonders for Belle & Sebastian at the start of their career and people write about Marilyn Manson for being, well, Marilyn Manson. You don’t have to devise a huge, calculated persona, but giving people a reason to check out your show or your CD before the others can only help.

5.Bribe ‘Em – Another way to stand out from the crowd is plain old free stuff. Even press people and label bosses love getting something for nothing, and you’ll whip your fans into a frenzy (and get new fans) by giving stuff away. Some ideas:

•Put some money behind the bar at a show and give free drink passes to all the industry people who come to check you out.
•Give people on your mailing list an exclusive download once a month (be it a new song or an alternate version of a song)
•At gigs, raffle (for free) mix CDs made by the band – everyone who signs up to your mailing list at the show gets entered in the drawing.

6.Branding – Get your name out there. Make up some stickers, badges, posters, lighters or anything else you can think of that include your band’s name. Then, leave the stuff anywhere you can. Pass them out at your favorite clubs, leave them on the record shop counter, poster the light posts – go for it. Soon, your name will be familiar to people even if they don’t know why, and when they see your name in the paper advertising an upcoming show, they’ll think “hey…I know that name, I wonder what that’s all about..”

7.Keep Track of Your Contacts – As you go through all of these steps, chances are that you are going to pick up a lot of new contacts along the way. Some of these contacts will be industry people and some will be fans. Never lose track of a contact. Keep a database on your computer for the industry people you have met and another database of fan contacts. These databases should be your first port of call for your next promotional campaign – and these databases should always be growing. Don’t write anyone off, even if you don’t get much feedback from them. You never know who is going to give you the break you need.

Tips:
1.Know When to Act Small – This step ties in with targeting the right audience and identifying your goals – you can save a lot of time spinning your wheels by keeping the small stuff small. While it’s always useful to keep other people up to date with what’s happening in your career, that guy from Rolling Stone doesn’t really need to know every time your band is playing a half hour set at the local club, especially if the local press really hasn’t given you much coverage yet. When you’re getting started, the easiest place to start a buzz is your local area. Build up the small stuff to get to the bigger stuff.

2.But Know When to Act Large – Sometimes, a larger campaign really is in order. Go full speed ahead when you have something big brewing, like:

•A new album
•A tour
•An important piece of news, like an award or a new record deal
This kind of news warrants contacting both the media and people you want to work with, like labels, agents, managers and so on.

3.Find the RIGHT Niche – As mentioned, finding your niche is helpful in getting noticed. There is one caveat however – make sure you get noticed for the right reasons. You certainly will get some attention for bad, unprofessional behavior, but the problem is that your music won’t be what everyone is talking about – and isn’t that what you really want to be recognized for? Don’t do yourself the disservice of self promoting a bad rep for yourself. Make sure you get noticed for your talent instead.

Also, don’t be fake. If you’re not sure what your niche is yet, don’t push it. Stay true to yourself and your music.

4.Grow your Database – In addition to keeping tracks of the contacts you have, don’t be afraid to help your database grow by adding some “dream” contacts to your list. Is there an agent you want to take notice of you? Then include them on your press release mailing list or promo mailing list when you have big news to share. Let them know you’re still working and still building your career – pretty soon, they may be knocking on your door.

5.Take a Deep Breath – For many people, the idea of self promoting their music to their fans is easy, but the idea of calling up the press is downright terrifying. Relax. Here’s the truth – some people you call will be nice, some people won’t be. Some people will never return your calls or emails. Some will. You shouldn’t take any of it personally. You definitely shouldn’t be afraid to try. Covering bands is the job of the music media – they expect to hear from you. Don’t be discouraged by someone who is rude, or someone who is polite, but still says “no”. Don’t write them off, either. Next time, you may hear “yes.”

SOURCE:

http://musicians.about.com/od/beingamusician/ht/selfpromote.htm


Industry Tips & Advice: What is a Mechanical License?

Producer, musician, and label owner George Howard discusses what mechanical licenses are and how they make money, how revenue from mechanicals is collected, and the controlled composition clause that reduces the mechanical royalty rate under certain circumstances.


ARTICLE: The Benefits Of An Electronic Press Kit In Music

Today we’re going to look at what an electronic press kit is (Also known as a EPK) and what you as a musician would include in one. We also look at how having an EPK would benefit you. If you haven’t made an electronic press kit yet, now is the time to do so.
What Is An Electronic Press Kit?

First of all, what is an EPK? Well, a EPK is a press kit in digital format. If any journalists want any information about you or your band, they would search your website to see if you have a pack for the media. This will be your pack.

Some of the contents of musician’s electronic press kits can typically be found on their social networking pages, such as their Facebook, Reverb Nation, and MySpace pages. The difference between these sites and an electronic press kit however, is that the press kit takes the fragmented bits of information scattered across various profiles, and merges them into one concise entity. The end result is a single destination for every bit of information a professional in the music industry could ever need to know about you or your band.
Benefits Of An Electronic Press Kit (EPK) For Your Music

So if a lot of it is already out there (Your bio, photos, sounds, and awards), why take the time to regurgitate what you’ve already done for your social media sites? Well, here are a few good reasons:

EPK’s Are Streamlined.
Event coordinators and members of the press are busy people; they don’t have time to wait for your MySpace page with 15 videos and a high resolution background to load. If they want to see the videos and they want to see your fancy photo shoot, they’ll navigate to the video and photo sections of your press kit. Don’t make them sift through all of that when they’re really just looking for an email address or a band roster, you will find that you lose a lot of important people’s interest fast.

Different Information Types For Different People.
Fans want to watch video clips of you performing at the last concert they went to, they want to leave you a comment to let you know how much they loved your show, and they want to sign up for your newsletter. Journalists want facts: Awards you’ve won, venues you’ve played, albums you’ve made, what your promotional efforts have been like, and a list of where you’re performing next.

Saving Music Event Coordinators Time.
Who is the main point of contact for bookings and how can they be reached? How much original material does your band play? What equipment and instruments do you have? What is the approximate footprint of space needed to perform? What additional amenities will you need? If event coordinators can easily find this information without ever asking, you’ve saved them and yourself one or two rounds of emails or phone calls before you ever initiate contact.
Cover All Bases With Your EPK Electronic Press Kit

When creating your electronic press kit, remember that more is better than not enough. It’s impossible to predict what information a reporter could be interested in, so it’s best to have it all. They may want to know the last show you had in their city, the name of your first EP, the title of that one song you sang about your aunt Donna, you don’t know. So cover it all, otherwise you risk losing the opportunity to be mentioned by them.

If you want press, you need to have an electronic press kit. This makes you easily accessible, and appear to be easy to work with. So don’t delay, get your EPK up and running on your website today!
-Danielle- Art of Melody


Industry Tips & Advice: How to start a career in radio and get music on the radio

LWO Magazine presents 102 JAMZ radio personality Shelly Flash. Take a look at this interview if you want a career in radio or want to know how to get you music on-air.


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Sell 200,000 CDs Without a Record Company – Ty Cohen

Learn How to Market, Promote & Sell Your Music Worldwide Using Nothing More Then MySpace!


Industry Tips & Advice: MUSIC PUBLISHING – AN INTRODUCTION (Part 2 of 2) by Alan Korn

This article is part 2 of an overview on music publishing. In the last article I discussed what music publishers do and the types of income they collect. This column looks at typical publishing deals that are available.

SHOULD I ENTER INTO A PUBLISHING DEAL?
Actually, not every artist needs to enter a publishing deal. It may be wiser to first obtain a major record deal before finding a music publisher. Conversely, publishers may want nothing to do with an artist who doesn’t have a record deal or some other guaranteed way to generate income. In addition, some artists may prefer to hold onto their copyrights and let administration agencies collect their publishing income.

HOW IS SONGWRITING INCOME SPLIT WITH A PUBLISHER?

With the exception of print music, income from musical compositions is generally split on a 50/50 basis between the music publisher and writer. The publisher’s half of this income is called the “publisher’s share,” and the writer’s half is the “writer’s share.”

To illustrate how this works in the real world, let’s take the following example. Imagine a publisher collects slightly more than $.68 (68 cents) in mechanical royalties from the sale of one of your CDs (actually 10 songs x $.091 cents per song x 75% rate for controlled compositions = 68.25 cents. I’ll round off the extra ¼ cent for purposes of this article). Assuming there are no collection costs deducted off the top, the publisher’s share comes to approximately $.34 (34 cents) and the writer’s share also comes to approximately $.34 (34 cents).

This financial split is a basic, but important, concept. When discussing publishing income, be sure to remember this distinction between “publisher’s share” and “writer’s share.”

WHAT TYPES OF MUSIC PUBLISHING DEALS ARE AVAILABLE?
STANDARD PUBLISHING AGREEMENTS

Standard music publishing deals come in several varieties. These include song-by-song publishing deals for specific compositions, and exclusive songwriter agreements that may last for a fixed period of years (usually 1 year with options to extend the term). These publishing deals may cover all songs written by an artist, or just those songs commercially released during the term of the agreement.

Under either arrangement, the publisher becomes the copyright owner of the songs. In exchange, the Publisher may pay the artist an advance based upon the potential value of the compositions. Subsequent income generated from these songs is then split, usually on a 50/50 basis. After the publisher recovers its advance, the artist is paid the “writer’s share” of net income received, while the publisher retains its publisher’s share.

CO-PUBLISHING AGREEMENTS

Co-publishing deals are similar to the above arrangement, except the artist (or the artist’s publishing entity) co-owns a percentage of the copyright along with the publisher. It is common for both parties to each own 50% of the copyright, though percentages can vary from deal to deal.

In a CO-publishing deal, the songwriter’s publishing entity also receives a percentage of the “publisher’s share” of income. Thus, using the above hypothetical, an artist would receive the “writer’s share” of the publishing “pie” (i.e., 34 cents), while also receiving up to half the net income from the publisher’s share of the publishing “pie”(i.e., an additional 17 cents).

Although CO-publishing deals are sometimes better than standard publishing deals, not all CO-publishing deals are in the artists best interest. For instance, some independent record labels require new artists to enter into a CO-publishing deal with the label’s “publishing” entity. (Ironically, few major labels require this of their artists). Even if you are offered an additional advance for such a deal, you should resist it! Here’s why:

The record company’s goal here is to reduce the amount of money payable to you from record sales (since the record company gets to keep 50% of the “publisher’s share” of mechanical royalty income);
Independent record labels may lack the experience and resources to promote your songs like an independent publishing company;
An independent publisher has more incentive to demand and accounting and collect publishing income from your label; and
It may actually be in your interest to retain these copyrights and enter into an administration deal instead.
ADMINISTRATION AGREEMENTS

In an administration deal, the publishing administrator collects income and also helps promote the songwriter’s catalogue. An administration deal may last for a specific period of time (i.e., 3 years) or for one year with several options to renew. When the term is over, all rights revert back to the artist.

A publishing administrator is typically paid by deducting a percentage of the income it collects on behalf of the artist. After deducting this administration fee (anywhere from 10% to 20% of the gross proceeds) the administrator distributes 100% of the remaining net income to the songwriter(s). As an incentive to promote your songs, some administrators may also charge a slightly higher collection fee for income earned from cover songs.

In some cases, a songwriter may receive as much income from a co-publisher as a publishing administrator. However, while a CO-publisher may be able to offer a generous advance, an administration deal can provide an artist with greater financial and artistic control. There are also many advantages to retaining the copyright to your songs. For example, if your first record sells only moderately but your next CD becomes commercially successful, you may gain greater leverage to negotiate a favorable publishing, CO-publishing or administration deal at a later date.

FURTHER READING:
These two columns provide just a brief overview of the music publishing industry. Because publishing money is often a major source of revenue for recording artists, it is important to know about your publishing rights. For those who want to learn more about this area, one book worth reading is “Music, Money and Success: The Insider’s Guide to the Music Industry” by Jeff Brabec and Todd Brabec. The authors have years of experience in the music business, and their book provides a detailed guide to publishing industry practices, including tips on what to look for in a publishing deal.

Alan Korn
Law Office of Alan Korn
1840 Woolsey Street
Berkeley, CA 94703
Ph: (510) 548-7300
Fax: (510) 540-4821
aakorn@igc.org
www.alankorn.com

SOURCE:

http://www.alankorn.com/articles/publishing_2.html


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Create a Music Image That Sells

Creating an image is the most important tool for a recording artist today! This shows you how to develop one that sells.


Industry Tips & Advice: Music Law – What are Common Types of Music Publishing Contracts? by Ruben Salazar, Esq

The seven (7) basic music publishing contracts are:

(1) Single Song Agreement: This type of music publishing contract is an agreement between the writer and the music publisher in which the writer grants certain rights to a publisher for one or more songs. In single song publishing contracts, the writer is paid a one-time recoupable advance.

(2) Exclusive Songwriter Agreement (“ESWA”): Under the ESWA or “staff writer” contract, the song writer generally grants all of the publisher’s share of the income to the music publisher. The writer’s services are exclusive to the music publishers for a specified period of time. Thus, any compositions written within that period belong to the music publisher. These publishing contracts are usually offered to writers with some degree of success.

With this type of music publishing contract, because writer has a track record of writing hits, the publisher feels confident that it will recoup its investment. In return for signing away exclusive rights to some or all the writer’s songs, the writer gets paid by the publisher a negotiated advance against future royalties. The advance amount naturally depends on the writer’s bargaining power and on the competition in marketplace, if any. Under a staff writer deal, the writer is paid on a weekly or quarterly basis. An ESWA can be either tied to a record contract or independent of a record contract.

(3) Co-publishing Agreement (“Co-pub”): The co-publishing (“co-pub”) deal is perhaps the most common publishing contract. Under this deal, the songwriter and the music publisher are “co-owners” of the copyrights in the musical compositions. The writer becomes the “co-publisher” (i.e. co-owner) with the music publisher based on an agreed split of the royalties.

The songwriter assigns an agreed percentage to the publisher, usually (but not always), a 50/50 split. Thus, the writer conveys ½ of the publisher’s share to the publisher, but retains all of writer’s share. In a typical “75/25 co-pub deal,” the writer gets 100% of the song writer’s share, and 50% of the publisher’s share, or 75% of the entire copyrights, with the remaining 25% going to the publisher. Thus, when royalties are due and payable, the writer/co-publisher will receive 75% of the income, while the publisher will retain 25%.

(4) Administration Agreement (“Admin”): An administrative agreement takes place between a songwriter/publisher and an independent administrator, or between a writer/publisher and another music publisher. In an “admin deal,” the songwriter self-publishes and merely licenses songs to the music publisher for a term of years and for an agreed royalty split.

Under this music publishing contract, the music publisher simply administers and exploits the copyrights for another publisher/copyright owner. Only the most popular song writers can even consider asking for an admin deal. Under this coveted arrangement, ownership of the copyright is usually not transferred to the administrator. Instead, the music publisher gets 10-20% of the gross royalties received from administering and exploiting the songs for a certain period of time and for a certain territory.

(5) Collection Agreement: A collection publishing agreement is like an administrative publishing contract where the writer retains the copyrights, except that the publisher does not perform exploitation functions; like an accountant or business manager, it merely collects and disburses available royalty income.

(6) Sub-publishing Agreement: These are basically music publishing contracts in foreign territories between a U.S. publisher and a publisher in a foreign territory. They are like admin or collection deals (with no ownership of the copyrights being transferred to the sub-publisher), but limited to one or more countries outside the U.S.

Under this music publishing contract, the publisher allows the sub-publisher to act on its behalf in certain foreign territories. Often, they are limited to a group of countries, such as European Union (EU), GAS (Germany, Austria, Switzerland), Latin America, etc.

(7) Purchase Agreement: Under this publishing contract one music publisher acquires in whole or in part the catalogue of another music publisher, sort of like a merger of companies. With this type of music publishing contract, a “due diligence” investigation is done to determine the value of the catalogue.

SOURCE:

http://law.freeadvice.com/intellectual_property/music_law/types_publishing_agreement.htm


Industry Tips & Advice: 10 Tips on Social Media Marketing

10 Tips on Social Media Marketing Success-Part 1 From: MeettheBossTV
Nov 17, 2010

Social marketing is not new. Think of the Tupperware parties of the 50s. But social media, the technology that has truly enabled local to go global, is new. And you’re too late: it’s already been claimed by the crowd — meaning that marketers have at least one clear challenge: participate, don’t dictate. Online, people talk to people, not to brands.

Includes:
Alex Hunter, Independent Brand Consultant
Ian Chapman Banks, General Manager, Dell
Julian Persaud, Managing Director, Google
Ji Hee Nam, VP Digital Media, MTV
Paul Soon, Regional Director, XM/JWT


Industry Tips & Advice: SVP of Island Def Jam Records talks Sales Strategy

SVP of Island Def Jam Records talks Sales Strategy From: MeettheBossTV
Feb 1, 2010

How do you react to a rapidly changing marketplace? Christian Jorg, SVP for Island Def Jam Records tells us how the music industry will profit from change, and why new media is the best friend a sales team could have. … (more info) (less info) View comments, related videos, and more


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Dj – Danny Rampling Shoom Interview

Everything You Need to Know about DJ’ing and Success

Life is about relationships, people, happiness, health, career and so much more. You deserve the very best and to live a charmed life. I’ve included tips and secrets to keep you at the top of your game, whatever game you are in. The insider secrets I share with you about the music industry and DJing sections precede what I deem to be the most important section, all about true lasting success, fulfillment and happiness.

Do you want to learn the secrets why some people are successful and others aren’t? Ask yourself. How successful do you want to be? You just need to decide on what level you want to play at! As a future public personality, it’ s vital that you are prepared and ready for the success that will come to you. Would you like to know all of the best secrets of success that I’ve learned over a lifetime?

Your Blueprint For Success There is so much more to life than decks. Honest! http://dj-world-guide.mariakaran.com/ Everything You Need to Know about DJ’ing and Success

Fastrack Your Success

Learn About the Electronic Music Business

Learn How to Market Yourself
* How to Approach Nightclubs & Promoters to Get a Gig
* Ingenious Ways to Increase your Fan Base
* How to prepare the perfect demo for promoters and club owners
* Which DJ agencies to contact
* How to break into the radio broadcasting
* What it takes to be a great resident DJ
* The essential skills to be a great mobile DJ
* How to promote yourself using different mediums
* How to develop a strong, professional image and identity
* Advice on Finding Professional Photography & Design (& other skill sets), Cheaply!

Everything You Need To Know About DJing &; Success also contains an extensive bonus section, full of industry contacts and resources,
which in itself has taken me YEARS and YEARS (and thousands of pounds) to collate. This alone is worth thousands of pounds.

http://dj-world-guide.mariakaran.com/

Everything You Need to Know about DJ’ing and Success


Industry Tips & Advice: Music Industry A-Z Part: DJ & Mixtapes

Music Industry A-Z “How To” Documentary produced by MDE directed by Sean Crawford. Starring Swizz Beatz, Sean Paul, Fat Joe, Pitbull, Juelz Santana, Cool n Dre, Chris Lighty, Slim Thug, DJ Drama, DJ Camilo, Jadakiss, NORE, James Cruz, Nina Sky, Rupee, Memphis Bleek, Angie Martinez, Killer Mike and many more appear in this “How To” break into the music business documentary.


Industry Tips & Advice: How to Become a DJ at a Club – Important First Lessons by John Newcomb

DJing is a difficult industry to break into. You may know all the technical aspects of DJing and may even be able to teach others how to become a DJ, but success may still elude you because of the tough competition.

The first thing you need to know is that unless you are phenomenally talented, it will take a long time to get a well paying gig at a good club. You will initially have to begin by freelancing. Freelance DJs are at the very bottom of the DJ industry and do face certain scorn from professionals. The irony is that even the professionals started out as freelancers.

Freelance DJs can usually be found playing at weddings, birthday parties, and small, local events such as school dances. I know this sounds like DJ hell, but this is a very important stage for a DJ – it teaches you how to play music for a very diverse crowd. More importantly, small gigs like these help you pick up the nuances of DJing – charisma, gauging the mood of the crowd, etc. while still getting some all important practice.

These gigs are also good for networking. As any professional DJ will tell you, DJing is a lot about knowing the right people. Try to get to know people whereever you are playing, even if its a wedding. Who knows you may just catch the eye of the right person and land yourself a good gig at a club.

The night club scene is, of course, where all the action is. Before you graduate to this level, you would have hopefully played in smaller gigs several times and have a firm grip on the technical as well as non-technical aspects of DJing. Night club gigs are often make-or-break opportunities (unless you happen to know the owner of the club, of course), and all your experience will come handy at moments like these.

The most important thing for a good DJ is to have a style that is unique to him. This can only be created through extensive practice. At the night club level, having your own unique sound will help set you apart from the others and hopefully open up doors for even more lucrative gigs.

Moral of the story: as a DJ, you should never shirk from any sort of gig, no matter how small it may be. The best DJs started out playing at weddings and school dances. These are valuable practice grounds and you should take up these opportunities whenever you get them.

SOURCE:

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Become-a-DJ-at-a-Club—Important-First-Lessons&id=5644762


Industry Tips & Advice: The Differences Between Songwriting in NYC & Nashville by Cliff Goldmacher


As a transplanted songwriter from Nashville to New York City, I’ve had the chance to observe, up close, the approaches to songwriting and the songwriting communities in both cities. While there are of course many similarities, there are also quite a few differences. By the way, I feel I should mention that the following observations are really more my impressions than hard facts.

Differences Within the Similarities

In this article, I’ll start with a similarity between New York and Nashville as it’s readily apparent and then explain how, within that similarity, one city differs from the other. One of the first similarities is that both cities have huge songwriting populations. The depth and breadth of talent in both places encompass many more genres that the obvious country music for Nashville and pop and rock music for New York. There are great pop writers in the suburbs of Nashville and extremely accomplished country songwriters living in Greenwich Village.

Finding the Songwriters

One difference between the two songwriting communities is how easy they are to locate. Because Nashville’s artistic community is predominantly made up of singers, songwriters and musicians, it’s much easier to find the music/songwriting community there. New York, on the other hand, has a wonderful songwriter population, but it’s mixed in with the countless other artists and creative types that live there and is thus less obvious. In other words, it takes a little more effort to find the songwriters in New York, but believe me, they’re there.

Before moving from Nashville to New York, I’d taken several writing trips a year up to New York and, by a process or trial and error, I found a core group of NYC songwriters that became my go to people on every trip. This way, when I eventually moved to New York, I felt like I was instantly part of the community even though I had to discover it little by little. I highly recommend this approach for anyone considering a move to New York as it eases the transition and makes the entire process much less overwhelming.

Co-writing

Although both New York and Nashville have large numbers of songwriters, co-writing is much more a part of the day to day routine in Nashville. It’s not unusual for a Nashville writer to have five co-writing appointments in a week where they meet with a different cowriter every day in a publishing company office on Music Row. This happens for several reasons. First of all, as a hired staff songwriter for a Nashville publishing company, you are given a yearly quota of songs that you need to fulfill. The more songs you write, the more quickly you’ll fulfill your quota. Publishers make a real effort to connect songwriters they think will work well together and go as far as to set up co-writing appointments for their writers. As a result, it’s fairly common in Nashville to be set up on a “blind date” cowrite. Secondly, even though you’re only credited with half a song for a cowrite, it’s easier to motivate yourself to write if you’ve got someone to collaborate with. The act of scheduling appointments and being expected to show up significantly eases the stress of having to create on a schedule. This approach seems odd to a lot of New York writers who are either artists themselves and used to writing with their own bands or are songwriters used to working with artists whose schedules are much less predictable.

Lyrics

Staying with the generality that you’re writing country in Nashville and pop or rock in New York, I’ve noticed that the rules of lyric-writing between these genres and cities differ significantly. In Nashville, the story is king. This means that the lyric has to make perfect sense, the images are concrete and the story has a logical flow from beginning to end. There’s not a lot of room for poetic, impressionistic lyrics that don’t have the arc of a story. New York, on the other hand, while it certainly has its share of great songwriter/storytellers, has a broader tolerance in its pop and rock genres for words that “feel” and “sound” good together. Please don’t misunderstand. It takes just as much skill to write a great pop lyric where the words convey the emotion of the song and carry the nuances of the melody as it does to write a great story in a country song, but it’s a different skill set. I’ve found that switching from one approach to the other can be creatively liberating and quite a bit of fun. Also, it’s interesting to see how one city’s lyrical approach can bleed into the other’s. In this way, you can end up with country lyrics where the words in the story sound good next to each other or pop lyrics with the arc of a story to them.

Labels

Speaking of artists, another similarity in the two cities is that they are both home to major record labels and their signed artists. This alone attracts a huge number of songwriters to both cities. The difference here is that country music artists are still largely dependent upon outside songs for their projects. In New York, bands tend to write their own material and it is less common for these artists to go looking for outside songs. Occasionally songwriters will be paired with these bands/artists in New York allowing the writers to end up with cuts on these acts. Of course, all of these distinctions are lessening as more country artists write and cowrite their albums as well.

You Can’t Lose

At the end of the day, both communities are great places to work and create. Ironically, after living in Nashville, working as a staff songwriter and writing for the country market for twelve years, my first cut was with a New York writer and was recorded by an Irish tenor on Universal Records named Ronan Tynan. In my opinion, it was the blend of our New York and Nashville songwriting sensibilities that came together to create that song. What I mean by this is that somewhere between the soaring melody more suited to pop and the lyric that had more of a country attention to detail, we came up with a classical crossover song. So, if you’re a Nashville writer thinking about working in New York (or vice versa) I’d highly recommend it. Sometimes it’s the differences that create the best art.

SOURCE:

http://www.songwriting.net/blog/bid/57769/The-Differences-Between-Songwriting-in-NYC-Nashville


Industry Tips & Advice: Social Media Marketing for Your Music Business by Japheth

The new digital landscape has caused an apparent tsunami in the music industry. With the rather constant barrage of reports and claims indicating that digital music downloads (both legal and illegal) are financially bringing down the industry, one might assume that digital technology is the enemy. Although a pessimistic attitude is somewhat appropriate for those businesses tied to their old-world models of manufacturing and distribution, the opposite is true for those willing to embrace digital technology and marketing for their music business. In the same way that digital music for artists has allowed for selling to more fans than previously possible with selling CDs alone, digital marketing provides opportunities and solutions to reach more potential fans than the artist could by merely connecting with people at music venues. Internet marketing, specifically social media marketing, allows an artist to target not only the local scene, but a truly international base of fans.

The New Music Ecosystem


Bas Grasmayer posted an article on Hypebot.com entitled The Ecosystem Approach: Introducing Non-Linear Music Marketing for the Digital Age. He talks about how the Internet and digital mediums have brought a new non-linear ecosystem to the world of music marketing. This means that the interaction among a group of consumers plays a larger role today in music business. The direct connections and control of the music industry now take a back-seat to the driving force of community influence.

Today, retention or keeping fans requires “stimulating the non-linear communication.” In the new ecosystem, you must facilitate consumers or fans building relationships with each other. Your product will still be the central point of the activity, but the customers interacting among themselves will propel and cause viral marketing for your product. Grasmayer explains it with a party analogy:

Treat every listener as a guest to your house party. If you don’t introduce them to others, you’ll be the center of attention all the time, but you can’t talk to everyone at the same time, so people are likely to get bored and leave. The key to a successful party is connecting the strangers, so they can have fun together. You’re still the center of the ecosystem, but you’re not the only person to communicate to. The communication becomes non-linear!

Besides the interpersonal communication among the fan base, you must also personally build a direct connection with each consumer or fan using such tools as social media networking. When you connect with fans and give them a reason to buy, you will ultimately make money. Nurture the connection by being authentic and consistent, always being able to admit when things go wrong and fixing the issues.

Finally, listen to the ecosystem. Make sure your marketing plans are fluid and evolve according to the feedback from your digital community of fans and customers. This could be called social media optimization. The key to success is giving people what they want.

Engage with Purpose

Brian Solis, globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in new media and author of the book Engage!, was recently interviewed on the subject of engaging with a purpose. He states that no matter the business or size, “every company should start with learning.” This ties back into listening to the ecosystem. One must intentionally monitor the conversations and activities of the community to know how to effectively engage that community. Solis states: “Social media didn’t invent conversations and opinions, but it allows us to have access to what people think and share—right now.”

The interviewer asked the question: “How much time should a company allocate to social media engagement?” Solis says, “The answer lies in what you see and also the position you want to take in social.” The time spent correlates to the success of the marketing. In other words, it takes a “significant commitment” to have productive efforts. Solis suggests testing with pilot programs and evaluating the outcomes as you go.

If you are like me, you’ll discover that social networks can become a black hole on your time. To avoid the time-sucking properties of social media, set goals and objectives. This is really where engaging with purpose comes into play. Know your purpose and develop a plan. By sticking to the plan and engaging your fans with a purpose, you will find yourself not only spending the right amount of time on your efforts, but find each connection supporting your overall goals.

Practical Tips

You’re probably saying, “That’s all great in theory, but what about a practical application?” Luckily I’ve been involved professionally in web development and marketing since 1996. Part of my focus over the years has been in developing artist-to-fan relationships using the Internet. Here are some practical solutions that I’ve implemented with success using social media marketing:

Website
Although probably not the main source of discovery of new fans, the website for an artist or band is the foundation for an Internet marketing strategy. At the recent SXSW Music Conference, a panel discussion was held on the topic, You’ve Built a Social Network, Now What? Here was the main theme: “The artist web site is critical to a band’s success in the world of social networking. Social networks like Facebook, Twitter, MySpace – proliferate in number, grow audiences, and some even eventually die off.”

One never knows what social media tools will exist in the future. So it is imperative that your website become the center of your marketing efforts as a familiar, stable home that fans can return to. That’s why Paul Sinclair of Atlantic Records says that an artist’s website is the first component they work on when developing a social media strategy. According to Michael Fiebach, digital marketing strategist and artist manager at Famehouse, “Bands are simply ‘renting their fans to social networks’ if they do not build their own web site.”

Myspace
I believe that Myspace is still a viable resource for music marketing. When searching for a band or artist on Google, Myspace Music profiles rank at the top of the search results. It many times is still the best place to find and stream the music of an artist or band for free. There are some teenage sub-cultures that are very active on Myspace, even more than on other networks such as Facebook. If your music is of a genre associated with one of these sects, then Myspace is potentially the perfect solution for attracting new fans.

When building your Myspace Music profile, be sure to include the names of similar bands and describe your musical style. This serves as a list of keywords that help with the discovery of your profile in search results.

When building your fan base, stay away from services that claim to add friends or fans to your list. Many of these so-called fans will actually be fake profiles or even real people who you will never be able to convert into a true fan. Start by adding a small number of fans from similar artists that realistically would appreciate your music. Connect or engage with that group to solicit feedback concerning your music, profile, and marketing efforts. This is similar to the pilot program that Brian Solis speaks of. Use the gained knowledge to decide on continuing your efforts with the same types of users or whether to look at other types of users for connecting.

Facebook
To be truly successful, a band or artist must use Facebook as a tool. Create a Facebook Page as an artist or band. Do not use a personal profile. Once your Page has acquired 25 fans, you will be able to use a custom Facebook URL. You will also want to set up a custom landing page instead the default wall for your Page. Non-fans visiting your Page will initially see the landing page you specify. I use iLike to create this landing page, but I have seen several others that use ReverbNation for theirs.

I have found that the most successful way to build a fan base on Facebook is with Facebook Ads. You can target these text-based ads at users who have indicated they like a particular artist or band that is similar to you. Because you only pay-per-click, you can gain great exposure with the impressions.

I ran a Facebook Ad campaign for a music artist Page. I spent a total of $99.96. The ad received a total of 497,804 impressions. That’s about 2% of a penny for each impression. Those impressions resulted in 321 clicks. That’s about 31 cents per click. Of those clicks, 191 people actually clicked the Like button and decided to become a “fan” of the Page. That means it cost about 52 cents to gain a new fan. If only 1 in 10 decides to become a customer and buy a digital album on iTunes at a price of $9.90, the artist would actually make a profit. This is because an artist receives roughly 70% of the iTunes revenue and the one buying customer came at a cost of roughly $5.23.

Last.fm and PureVolume
Place your focus on your website, Myspace profile, and Facebook Page. Only if you find extra time, look at the additional music networking sites of Last.fm and PureVolume. I’ve used both as part of my marketing strategy, using some of the same principles suggested for Myspace. Last.fm also has advertising campaigns called Powerplay that allow you to target Internet radio listeners with guaranteed plays of your music.

Engage with HootSuite
To make the most use of your time and effectively engage with your fan base, use a social media tool such as HootSuite. This application allows you to simultaneously post status updates across social networks such as Facebook, Myspace, and Twitter. These status updates are not the engagement, but offer opportunities for engagement. HootSuite allows for following both the public and private conversations on your social network profiles and allows for you to interact. Use this to your full advantage to quickly engage your fans across social platforms.

Later this month, we will take a look at some case studies of music businesses and artists that are successfully using social media and integrating social media into their marketing efforts. Until then, go forth learning, testing, and engaging.

SOURCE:

http://www.360digitalartist.com/social-media-marketing-music-business/


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